Teaching Nomad - Teaching Opportunities in China

Provider: Teaching Nomad

Teaching Nomad is your connection to teaching in China. We are a western owned and operated teacher placement agency operating out of Shanghai, China. We take a lot of pride in connecting dedicated teachers with great school all over the country. Teaching Nomad has programs for teachers of all experience levels including Professional educators, Experienced ESL instructors and Beginner teachers!

Contact us today to be connected with a dedicated placement consultant already living in China who can answer all your questions and find the perfect match for you. Our clients include International schools, Language training schools, Primary/ Middle/ High schools and kindergartens.

Each client has been thoroughly researched to ensure a great working and living experience for you. We look forward to welcoming you to China!

Program Info

Location: 
  • China
Salary / Benefits: 

CNY 8,000 - 25,000/month + Potential expat packages including: airfare, housing, insurance, meals and more!

Length: 
1 year+

Program Reviews (29)

96%
Positive
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  • Benefits
    94%
  • Support
    96%
  • Fun
    93%
  • Facilities
    96%
  • Safety
    93%
  • Deborah Vasconcellos
    Age: 31-50
    Female
    Canada
    York University
    More than pleased!
    04/24/2015

    I was looking for ESL jobs in Asia when Sophia Isis, from Teaching Nomad, found me. Since our first contact, Sophia has been friendly, personable and very efficient. I felt like she really understood my needs and my personality, and was there to help me find the perfect position. I owe my job in China, and probably the biggest adventure of my life, to Sophia. Thank you!

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  • Rafael Katz
    Age: 51 or older
    Male
    China
    Brown University
    The easiest recruiting process I have been through
    04/08/2015

    As someone who has used ISS and SA, Teaching Nomad was by far the easiest process I have gone through. It didn't cost me anything, unlike those other two programs and after one email contact, I was able to speak with the Teaching Nomad representative and get all the information I needed to continue with the job application. It was quick, efficient, friendly, and effective (I got the job)

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  • Martin Nolan
    Age: 25-30
    Male
    Carow, Ireland/Shanghai, China
    University of Limerick
    Very Professional
    02/27/2015

    Going through Teaching Nomad was the best decision I could have made coming to Shanghai. Sophia,who was my recruiter was very helpful and patient in dealing with my applicaton. She responded to any questions I had in a timely manner which made the entire process very straightforward. I haven't been in Shanghai very long but thus far everything has gone smoother than I could have ever expected. A large part of this is due to the guys at Teaching Nomad. I 100% recommend this company to anybody considering coming to Shanghai.

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  • Brian
    Age: 31-50
    Male
    Wuxi, China
    Wilkes University
    Excellence
    01/03/2015

    Educators wary of generic employment listings via web sites intended for the average must avail of the quality services offered by the wonderful employees of Teaching Nomad. Career > job. Especially considering the economy in China, educators will appreciate obtaining exciting / rewarding employment.

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  • Jimmie Robinson
    Age: 25-30
    Male
    Rosedale, Maryland
    Excellent support, thank you!
    11/23/2014

    Teaching Nomad thank you for being a major support system throughout this process! Although the process can be stressful at times, my placement consultant, Oliver Gorman has done a phenomenal job at easing the anxiety by responding to emails in a timely manner; by addressing any concerns that have; and by giving great overall advice. Thank you Teaching Nomad and Oliver for making my desire to help others and experience another part of the world possible!

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  • laura
    Age: 31-50
    Female
    Shanghai, China
    Living in China with a family
    11/17/2014

    The thrill of moving half-way across the world was amazing. The move was from the US to China with my husband and two small boys. The culture shock was very difficult to get used to along with not knowing any Mandarin. The sights and history of China is amazing and was the most memorable experience of living abroad. It was very difficult working with local teachers on a day to day basis because the work ethics are so different from the US. The public transportation system in Shanghai is exceptional. It was very reliable and inexpensive. We enjoyed the food and the abundance of shopping opportunities in the big city. I would recommend for everyone to live/work abroad for at least a year. Your views and thoughts are broadened as well so you leave with a greater sense of appreciation for all countries of the world. I do not recommend long term living in China because you can become very disconnected with western ways and sometimes lose a sense of who you are or where you came from. But, some people might want this!

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  • Evelyn Lau
    Age: 25-30
    Female
    Shanghai
    Victoria University of Wellington
    Thanks Patrick
    11/11/2014

    Thank you Patrick for your support and guidance in getting me to Shanghai! You were willing to skype before we left to answer any questions we had and you replied to emails very quickly. Since arriving you have continued to offer that support , and I thank you for that.

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  • Lauren
    Age: 31-50
    Female
    Shanghai, China
    University of Stellenbosch
    Here is to China
    11/10/2014

    Many people decide to travel overseas from a young age and with all the restrictions, teaching English abroad is a great way to get paid and travel...so i decided to jump on in and head off to Shanghai, china. My recruiter from Teaching Nomad was Sophia Isis. Her help during my recruiting process put me at ease and less stressed about the fact that i was moving alone to the biggest city in the world. Funny enough, my roommate was also recruited by Sophia to teach in China. Talk about a small world.

    How could this program be improved?

    I think it would be great if the recruiters could touch base with the candidates once they are in china. Via email would be best

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  • Sarah
    Age: 31-50
    Female
    Beijing
    Other
    Excellent recruitment services and Recruiter
    10/22/2014

    Teaching Nomad was helpful, straightforward, patient and supportive. Oliver Gorman my recruiter was fantastic and I am so grateful for his help during this process. He was knowledgeable and is an asset to the company.

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  • Andrew Goforth
    Age: 31-50
    Male
    Spartanburg, South Carolina
    Lander University
    Thank you for the support and help!
    10/22/2014

    Would like to say thank you for your tremendous support and help in placing me with a school in China! I am now working everyday in a fantastic school and teaching children about something I am very passionate about! MUSIC! I spend everyday spreading the beauty and amazing ability of music to have a positive impact on peoples lives. Thanks again!

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  • Larissa Tavares
    Age: 19-24
    Female
    Shanghai, China
    Arizona State University
    Teaching Nomad is La Classe
    10/07/2014

    Oliver from Teaching Nomad has displayed nothing but pure professionalism in helping me find a teaching position in China. He was completely dependable, punctual (answered all of my emails immediately), and assuring. He even answered questions I had on the weekends! I think one of the greatest attributes with working with him was that he gave me honest advice and looked out for my best interest. Overall, if I had the choice to do it again I most definitely would. I couldn't have asked for a better experience and I have never been happier with my decision.

    Not only has Oliver helped me with finding a school he has also made the transition into China easier by passing me a useful contact in finding an apartment, a list of places to go/see, and things to do while I spend my time here. I can't thank him enough. Thanks Ollie!

    Difficulties about living in China: Things that would normally take you 20 minutes to do back home (ex. going to the grocery store/ looking for food/ etc.) may take you anywhere from 1-3 hours. Plan accordingly.

    Highlights about living in China: Amazing people from all over the world completely different from you.

    An amazing experience.

    How could this program be improved?

    The TEFL requirement.....

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  • Stefani
    Age: 25-30
    Female
    Shanghai, China
    University of Southern California
    Career Teacher Highly Recommends TN
    09/21/2014

    I was impressed from the start by the professionalism and friendliness by the staff at Teaching Nomad. A recruiter was very quickly in contact with me and we set up a Skype interview to talk about the job possibilities for my qualifications and to answer my questions about China. This recruiter worked very closely with my partner and I over several months as we looked carefully at jobs and locations in China. We were able to secure positions that suited our very different teaching backgrounds in a part of China that suited our experience living abroad (none) and Chinese language level (we knew how to count).

    As a recent graduate from a Masters in Teaching program, I was looking for a position that would be good experience and pay well. I was pleased with the choices available and am absolutely in love with the school I have been placed at.

    They were also able to find a great position for my partner, who has teaching experience but no credentials, in his area of expertise.

    Our transition to Shanghai really has been easy thanks to the advice and help from the staff at Teaching Nomad.

    How could this program be improved?

    If I could change one thing it would be to fix their website. The layout is confusing and some of the features don't work. We looked at jobs on the website, wrote down the job numbers and then emailed with the recruiter about them.

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  • Kim Phillips
    Age: 19-24
    Female
    Shanghai, China
    University of South Florida
    Amazing Agency and Recruiters
    09/11/2014

    At first I was very nervous about my possible move to China, and found Teaching Nomad to help with the entire process. The application and interview process was smooth and enjoyable. The agency and its recruiters helped me with any questions that I had as well as help place me in a job that suited my personal goals.

    Both Patrick and Ginger, my job placement and visa recruiters, gave me reliable, updated information at all times, especially when paperwork was delayed from the government. Everything was done in an orderly and neat fashion.

    I truly appreciate all the work that Patrick and Ginger did as well as the rest of the staff upon arriving to Shanghai. Sophia and Brett, the company founders, helped with everything else once I landed, from paperwork to directions. Everyone at the agency is wonderful and extremely helpful and welcoming.

    I would highly recommend this agency to anyone looking for teaching positions within China.

    How could this program be improved?

    Paperwork was delayed, but that was the Chinese government's fault. Teaching Nomad rush-delivered through Fed-Ex my documents in time for my visa submission.

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  • Lucas Peltonen
    Age: 31-50
    Male
    Foshan, China
    University of Michigan
    Dependable
    09/08/2014

    Patrick at Teaching nomad was honest, responsive and dependable.

    After my initial conversation with him, he presented me with 4-5 schools that he thought would be a good match. I applied to three and ended up getting job offers from 2 of them. He was quite honest in describing the differences between the schools during my decision-making process, making it much easier.

    I had no difficulties with Teaching Nomad. Adjusting to life in China can be challenging, but Patrick was very helpful in providing me with information such as links, information sheets and advice.

    I would highly recommend Teaching Nomad to anyone who is considering looking for teaching positions here in China.

    How could this program be improved?

    There was one school that I was very interested in that filled all of its positions before my application was complete; however, that certainly was not Teaching Nomad's fault.

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  • Khushboo
    Age: 25-30
    Female
    India
    University of Birmingham
    Teaching Nomad - Great Experience
    09/08/2014

    Finding a job through Teaching Nomad was effortless. After completing the application process and questions on their website, Oliver my placement consultant took care of everything else.He was extremely supportive through out the entire hiring process. Overall an excellent recruiter.

    I am greatly appreciative of their services and would highly recommend Teaching Nomad to my friends/ colleagues.

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Alumni Interviews

  • volunteer children
    Oh, how students make us smile.

    Highlights: Well I have only been in China for about 2 months. But the highlight so far has been seeing the development of one child in my class. His name is Ryon. He is 3 and he is handicapped. When I first came to China, he did not participate at all. He simply walked around the classroom or would sit on a chair and stare into space. The last few weeks, Ryon has began to participate in class. He still wanders around a bit but he is participating. The biggest joy with him so far is that I said "Thank you" to him and he responded by saying "You're welcome". I was so happy!!! Most of the little kids will simply mimic whatever I say. So when I say "Thank you" to them they say "Thank you" back. So for Ryon to answer correctly was a big thrill. It isn't always the big things that make your day or your month... sometimes it is the little things!

    Morning: For me the morning time is the busiest time of the day. I do all of my teaching in the morning. I have a short class for all of the kids. We generally sing songs or play a game. I then have class with the oldest group (the 5 year olds). After that class, I have class with the middle kids (the 4 year olds) and then I have class with the little ones (2 and 3 year olds). I use the same topic in each class but I modify the lesson to fit the particular age group. I try to use a wide variety of teaching methods to keep the kids interested and participating.

    Afternoon: My afternoons are pretty free. I work in a Montessori school so the schedule is pretty loose. Most days we take the kids outside to a nearby park in the afternoon (after nap time). This time is spent by mainly watching the kids and helping them in any way. If we don't go outside, the kids will do individual work. Sometimes I will read books to the kids (I will read to them in English and sometimes the older kids will read to me in Chinese). I also play games with kids (on an individual basis). The afternoon is pretty free so it changes from day to day.

    Evening: I have to admit that my evenings are pretty quiet and boring! It has been a hard adjustment for me. I do not speak Chinese so it really limits what I can do. It is very difficult to go out to eat or go shopping by myself. My favorite restaurants have pictures of their food on the walls and I can simply point at the item I want. But I will go shopping, make dinner (or go out to eat), surf the web, read. I do a variety of things but it isn't super exciting!

  • china, bike, phoenix
    Enjoying a classic Chinese style bicycle!

    Why did you decide to find a teaching job through Teaching Nomad?

    Stefani: It was December and I was about 3 months away from finishing my MA in Teaching. My partner and I decided to seek adventure by moving out of the country for a year or two when I was done. We had some countries we were interested in, but we were willing to go anywhere in the world.

    China kept coming up. Pay for English speaking teachers is good, the cost of living is low, and the country itself is very interesting, both in terms of its economic future and its rich history. We settled on China and came across the Teaching Nomad website. I received a reply to my inquiry very quickly and so the ball started rolling.

    What made this teach abroad experience unique and special?

    Stefani: Everything about living in China has been unique and special for us. We had both moved around a bit before we made the decision to leave the country, but this is our first time living abroad. It is a bit nuts to decide to live abroad in a country where you don't speak or read the language. Luckily, we have had an amazing support team since arriving two months ago.

    For me, my placement school has been immensely supportive and has helped with everything from finding our apartment to deciding what to do on the weekend. Some great experiences include playing a Chinese card game with friends, developing a way to play softball with three people and one bat and glove, shopping for art at the painter's alley in Xujiahui, and exchanging Moon Cakes with our Chinese neighbors. Now we're looking forward to exploring beyond Shanghai!

    How has this experience impacted your future? (Personally, professionally, academically, etc.)

    china, qibao, brewery
    Brewery at a supermarket in Qibao

    Stefani: When we first set out to go abroad, we were only certain we wanted to go for a year, so we sought jobs with 1-year contracts. Now that we're here, we know we want to stay in China for at least two years and we're playing with the idea of continuing to teach in other countries after that. Not because leaving home and moving to a foreign country has been easy, but because, now that we've gotten through the transition, we are having a lot of fun!

    I also know the experience of being immersed in a new language is improving the way I relate to the language learners I teach. Immersing yourself in any new culture also changes the way you relate to your own culture and gives a wider perspective of history and world events. I am loving learning about China and I look forward to bringing that knowledge into my classrooms in the future.

    What is one piece of advice you would offer someone considering teaching abroad in China?

    Stefani: Learn some Mandarin. It will allow you to do so much more than if you are limited to spaces where you have a translator. You will also meet many interesting people during your time in China. Being able to chat with your vegetable seller or the business woman on the train will enhance your experience in China. That said, if you don't speak Mandarin, don't let that keep you from making the leap. Embrace the opportunity and ask lots of questions.

  • Why did you decide to use Teaching Nomad to teach abroad in China?

    Lucas's teach abroad experience in China

    Lucas: I was considering teaching in a few different countries and I spoke to several different recruiters and organizations. It takes a lot of faith to take a job overseas so I was asking as many questions as I could think of. However, not everyone could give me answers. I asked one organization about the violence that was happening in a particular country (my internet browser was literally open to a story about the violence) and they said, "I'm not really sure what violence you are referring to." That made me uncomfortable.

    In contrast, Teaching Nomad answered all of my questions very honestly and specifically. My particular recruiter had taught in China before so he knew exactly what he was talking about. I was comfortable with his experience and he explained the entire process to me in a very structured way. It looked like there were great opportunities in China, so I did a bit of research on Teaching Nomad. The ultimate decision came when I read the Go Overseas reviews about Teaching Nomad. The satisfaction rate was something like 96% - 98%, which was a lot higher than any other organization I saw.

    What made this teach abroad experience unique and special?

    Lucas's teach abroad experience in China
    The old vs. new in Guangzhou

    Lucas: I had taught in China before and one of the things I learned from my experience is that missing information can be crucial information. Programs try to paint as positive of a light as possible in order to attract the best candidates. However, there were some critical pieces of information "left out" that I didn't learn about until arriving in China. It made for a rude awakening and a difficult transition.

    With Teaching Nomad, I felt that I was getting a lot of good and honest information. Transitioning to China is a challenge no matter what but I felt like they were really helping me prepare for it. Now that I'm in China, I'm learning a lot, but I am incredibly appreciative of Teaching Nomad's assistance and honest feedback. My transition here has been 10x easier than the last time I was in China.

    How has this experience impacted your future?

    Lucas: I would say the biggest impact would be that there is even more opportunity here than I thought. Teaching Nomad helped me make a decision between a few job offers but now that I'm here, I realize the sky is the limit as to what I can do with my professional teaching future.

    What is one piece of advice you would offer someone considering teaching abroad in China?

    Lucas's teach abroad experience in China
    Lucas's favorite sign in China!

    Lucas: Ask a lot of questions before making any commitments or decisions. Ask about anything you can think of, although you probably don't know all of your questions until you've been here and a situation arises that makes you think to yourself, "Darn, I really wish I thought to ask that before I got here." Knowing answers to questions helps eliminate surprises and softens the transition to a new environment and a new job.

    Reach out to teachers that are working in the schools and cities you are thinking about. Ask someone like me your questions and learn what other questions you should be asking that you haven't thought of on your own.

    Oh, and download WeChat from the app store. It's basically China's version of Facebook/Twitter/Instagram. Get familiar with it. You will be using it for everything.

  • Interview with Hubert, teacher in China with Teaching Nomad

    Why did you decide to teach with Teaching Nomad in China?

    Hubert: Trust is paramount when bridging the unknown; and a trustworthy guide is needed. Teaching Nomad is a highly reputable firm that is compensated by the employing school seeking experienced talent; the educator candidate will learn that they can fully trust the firm to be responsible for their well being. They are qualitatively oriented and very professional (having been teachers themselves); they have an emphatic identification with each individual that they place in the field and this continues throughout the contract period. Given their high level of competence and professional demeanor, while carrying out highly detailed activities associated with employment criteria, I highly recommend this firm for educators who are looking for the life altering experience of teaching and learning overseas.

    What made this teach abroad experience unique and special?

    Hubert: For a teacher trained in Western pedagogy, it was an educational experience as I learned first hand about the practice and observation of the Eastern pedagogic methods. As the visiting teacher from another society, operating in a different educational environment, I gained a comparative perspective that contributed to my own skill base (something that is unobtainable in the teacher's residence of origins).

    How has this experience impacted your future? (Personally, professionally, etc)

    Hubert: Teaching in another society allows the visiting teacher to develop their own interpersonal communication skills. Having been a university professor of education with many international students, the experience enhanced my understanding of different ways of learning and hence understanding the science and art of teaching in an ever increasingly small world. This experience will give any teacher an emphatic understanding of different methods and educational philosophies that they will encounter, allowing them a greatly needed, emphatic identification with international students studying within the US educational systems.

    What is one piece of advice you would offer to someone considering teaching abroad in China?

    Hubert: While teaching abroad, I recommend that the visiting teacher primarily view themselves as a student and come to learn alternate ways of teaching. Education is not only about imparting language skills, but building relationships that make that possible. In a country that is rapidly changing, everyday you can expect a surprise, most of which are good. Be prepared for your job description to be modified (e.g. you may have been recruited as a high school teacher, but you are reassigned as a middle school teacher).

    However, your compensation package will not change; though, it may improve. Be patient with a keen eye on tracking the visa process; be prepared to educate yourself and the school as to how it's processed (i.e. tourist to work, then a resident visa). Additionally, once a teacher returns to the place of origin, they ought to attempt to work into their own training - new methods and a reformulated philosophy that they learned while in practice overseas.

Staff Interviews

  • Patrick Cazaly
    Meet Patrick!

    What position do you hold at Teaching Nomad? What has been your career path so far?

    I'm a Senior Recruiter and Account Manager at Teaching Nomad (TN). On the recruiting side this means that I interview prospective teachers who are interested in teaching abroad. We try to learn as much about a teacher as we can in a 25-30 minute Skype interview.

    What their past experience is like, their motivations for teaching abroad and what their career aspirations within the education industry are. This is probably the most satisfying part of the job because I can help steer teachers towards positions that best fit what they're looking for as well as give them a bit of career guidance on the best way to get where they want to be.

    On the account management side I visit schools to talk with the administration and teaching staff to make sure they meet TN's standards before signing them on as a client school. Once we've brought them on board it's mostly communicating with them about their vacancies and the applications of TN Teachers.

    Did YOU teach abroad?! If so, where and what inspired you to go?

    I did! Before taking on my current role I taught for a year in Songjiang, a south western suburb of Shanghai, China. I worked in a small, independent language training school, an evening and weekend gig. Prior to coming to China I had been travelling for over a year in South-East Asia and I'd met so many teachers who recommended teaching ESL that I thought I'd give it a go!

    China seemed like a good choice because I'd heard a lot about its rapid economic development and increasing importance in the world, plus I'd always wanted to have a crack at learning Mandarin since I'd often heard how difficult it was to learn. I like a challenge!

    What does the future hold for Teaching Nomad -- any exciting new programs to share?

    Actually we just launched TN TEFL Academy here in Shanghai. The Shanghai municipal government recently tightened their visa regulations which means that they'll no longer accept online TEFL certificates.

    We expect the rest of China will gradually follow so we decided to offer a comprehensive, 4 week in person course here in Shanghai so that teachers can meet governmental requirements and get a solid foundation in teaching at the same time. Eventually I'd like to see the Academy expanded to include International Bachelorette and Montessori certification, though that may be some way off!

    At the end of last year we also launched our substitute teacher program here in Shanghai which is gaining traction fast. A dedicated substitute supply service is something fairly new to China and up till now most international schools have had to scramble to find someone to cover classes whenever a teacher calls in sick. It's a great way for teachers to earn a little extra money, particularly if they've got a light work load.

    What about the future of the Teach Abroad industry? How do you think education will change over the next 10 years?

    In the past Teach Abroad has struggled with a bit of a stigma back home as not a "serious" option, like it's something that people do while putting off difficult, more important decisions back home. I think this is changing. There is a growing realization that you have a very good quality of life teaching abroad, that the compensation can be competitive with a career back home and that there are good opportunities for career progression.

    This is also reflected in the growth of international and foreign language schools that use foreign curriculum and require professional qualifications from their teachers. This is particularly obvious here in China where a lot of these schools are less than 15 years old, but I think it's a global trend.

    Increasingly a professionally qualified teacher can command western standard conditions and compensation anywhere in the world, often in places with a significantly lower cost of living. So I think you'll see a lot more people completing a BA or MA of Education with the intent of spending most of their teaching careers abroad.

    Which teach abroad destination is most underrated? Conversely, which is most overrated?

    China of course!! Haha Teach Abroad is traditionally associated with Japan and Korea but what I hear from a lot of my conversations with teachers who have taught there is that opportunities there seem to be drying up. I think the future of teach abroad is in the emerging economies of China, Vietnam, and Indonesia.

    Within that group China's higher salaries give it a pretty significant edge over the competition. China's huge population means that the strong demand for native English teachers, that drives these higher salaries, will continue for a long time to come. So to answer your question most overrated: Korea and Japan. Most underrated: Vietnam, Indonesia and China.

About the provider

The most important service that we provide is behind the scenes research of every school that we can find to identify those worth partnering with. There are 1000's of English schools in China, unfortunately not all of them are legitimate. We have contacted, spoke with and researched 100's of these schools and partnered only with those with a great reputation, great compensation and truly appreciate their teachers. Teaching Nomad has programs for teachers of all experience levels including Professional educators, Experienced ESL instructors and Beginner teachers!