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Why You Should Teach English Abroad at a Summer Camp

Summer camp

Summer camp. Just the mention of those words carries stigmas of sunshine, happy campers, smiling staff, lifelong friendships and unforgettable memories. If you want to do something meaningful abroad with your upcoming summer, why not become a part of the fun and teach English at a summer camp?

Of course, simply deciding to teach abroad at a summer camp isn't enough. You need to know how, where, and why you should be teaching abroad at a summer camp as well! That's where the teach abroad experts at Go Overseas come in, with this handy guide.

If you're intrigued at the idea of teaching at a summer camp this summer (or maybe even next summer, if you're a super planner), here's the why, where, and how to teach abroad at a summer camp.

Why Teach English at a Summer Camp Abroad?

Summer Camp at a Glance

Here’s the short list of what you can expect from your short term teaching English abroad contract:

  • Short-term contracts
  • Trips are sometimes included
  • Meals and lodging are usually included
  • Counselors are usually invited back each year
  • There is a large variety of camps and campers
  • Participate in fun activities
  • See a new part of the world
  • Build your resume
  • Expand your TEFL experience
  • Test the waters to see if you like teaching

Whether you're considering becoming a full fledged English teacher and want to try it out on a more short term scale, you're up for an adventure in a new country, or just looking to add some professional development to your education career, whatever the reason, here's a brief list of why you should teach English at a summer camp abroad:

1. Be a Kid Again

Though summer camps require long hours, often spending up to 12 each day with the campers from breakfast until bedtime, it’s not all hard work – there’s lots of play involved too. Camp directors try their best to have equal parts fun and education, and many times it’s a seamless transition when the education part comes into play. Even enjoyable group activities such as hiking, bike riding, jet skiing, etc., can be learning experiences when combined with wilderness info, teamwork and mind-juggling tasks.

And the best part about returning to camp as a counselor? You get to be a kid again. Join in the activities, participate in story telling around the campfire, lead a hike, teach them how to make s’mores, etc. You’re an adult, sure, but you’ll wear many hats: teacher, friend, guide, parent, etc. and you’re likely to have just as much fun as the campers.

2. Gain Work Experience

While it would be fun to just traipse around the planet during your summer vacation, the reality is that gap on your resume might not impress your future employers. Why not combine adventure with work by scoring one of these short term summer teaching jobs?

Depending on the location, you may have free time between camp weeks where you can explore your new surroundings, or perhaps you can tack a few week vacation to the beginning and/or end of your work.

3. Test Out Teaching English / Working Abroad

If you've never worked abroad or taught English, a short term summer teaching program might be the perfect way for you to test out the waters. For those seriously considering working in a longer teaching contract in the coming years, a summer camp English teaching job is the best way to get a real feel for the ESL classroom and how you perform in it.

Whatcha Waiting For?

Now's the time to get researching! Read reviews of teaching programs to better determine which experience is up your alley, and think long and hard about the destination that gets you most excited for moving abroad. Sign up for a program and kickstart the journey towards the best summer of your life!

Photo Credits: GVN.

Jessica J. Hill

Jessica J. Hill has taught English in Thailand and China. She now helps others do the same via her TEFL certification and job recruitment agency Teach English ESL. She also writes about her own experiences with teaching English abroad, cultural immersion and adventure travel on her blog Miss Adventure Travel.