ABROADER/ Student Exchange Vietnam

ABROADER

About

ABROADER, formerly known as Student Exchange Vietnam (SE Vietnam) was established with the mission of supporting international students to gain global awareness and local insights from ongoing engagement via Internship, Semester Abroad, Faculty-led Programs (Short Courses) in Vietnam. We have a strong commitment to offering reliable, flexible and affordable international education programs. Just share with us your expectation and let us help start your meaningful journey.

Currently, we are a member of VCCI (Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry), NAFSA (Association of International Educators, US), Forum on Education Abroad (US), the Institute of International Education’s Generation Study Abroad initiative and have partnership with the International Education Exchange Forum (IEEF) from Japan, Global link from Korea. We are also a partner of a wide range of universities & education organizations in Vietnam, Japan, Australia, the U.K, Singapore, the US, Canada, etc.

Website
abroader.org
Founded
2014

Reviews

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Anny
10/10
Yes, I recommend this program

ABROADER is such a supportive organization. Everyone is so kind and wishes the best for you. Even in remote settings, you can connect with people across the globe from you. Professionally, ABROADER assists you with your internship, offering valuable advice and mentorship. A remote internship requires you to be self-directed and responsible, and communication becomes more vital than ever. I’m glad ABROADER was a helpful bridge between the intern and host organization. This is definitely an experience that you will remember!

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Mary Jessy Milena
10/10
Yes, I recommend this program

I was doing an internship in Vietnam with GreenHub organization. A BROADER made sure that I get more than working experience. I was able to have fun, meet new people, learn different things about Vietnamese culture and food, and many other things. Even though it was online, I really enjoyed the virtual experience from Vietnam. I am so grateful that I got an opportunity to do an internship in Vietnam and I am thankful for the people I met and everything I learned. I hope I will have a chance to visit the place in person.

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Sai
9/10
Yes, I recommend this program

Julie and Ngan are incredible-- gained so much out of this and was really impressed by how organized this internship was given that it was virtual and across multiple timezones. The Abroader team checks in regularly and we have weekly meetings. They also organize cultural sessions which are really fun to attend-- I learned a lot about Vietnamese culture and again, was so impressed by how easy it was to make this connection with people I had never met before virtually. All in all, a great experience.

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Katryna
10/10
Yes, I recommend this program

It was an incredible experience and made something valuable out of the difficult situation of Covid-19. I learned so much about Vietnam and was able to connect with a bunch of peers in Vietnam. It was also a great social outlet during a remote internship which can feel isolating sometimes. I am so thankful for all the support Abroader provided and all the work they put into making a really great program. If you are doing a remote internship or looking to learn more about vietnam, this program is perfect for you.

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
Be engaged and talk during the zoom meetings! You'll only get out of it what you are willing to put into it!
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Sara
10/10
Yes, I recommend this program

I had such an incredible experience as a Public Health Remote Intern in Hanoi, Vietnam. From the support I received to the work I did with my team, I could not have asked for a more positive internship experience. Despite the fact that I was not able to travel to Vietnam, I felt so connected to the people and culture. The relationships I have built and the lessons I have learned are so priceless and humbling. I truly commend this program for the wonderful work they do and I am so incredibly grateful

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
The advice I would give as a former intern is to always keep an opened mind and be willing to adapt to unfamiliar circumstances. Flexibility is very important and makes the experience considerably more enjoyable.

Programs

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Alumni Interviews

These are in-depth Q&A sessions with verified alumni.

Why did you choose this program?

The South East Asia study tour looked like a great opportunity to explore both Singapore and Vietnam in an organized and exciting way. The prospect of having local buddies to show us around the city and help with the language barrier was a great relief. The university staff never hesitated to help the students when needed and provided good plans to mitigate any unforeseen problems that could occur while being overseas.

What did your program provider assist you with, and what did you have to organize on your own?

The University of Newcastle providers created a pre-departure guide to help give the students an understanding of what was required in Vietnam, what to expect and areas of concern to watch for. Additionally, prior to leaving Australia, there was a pre-departure meeting where things such as insurance and the must go places were discussed. The program provider and other university staff basically set up the entire trip; all that was required to organise on our own was the flights and vaccines required, making it nice and easy on the students.

What is one piece of advice you'd give to someone going on your program?

My advice for students wanting to go on the South East Asia study tour would be to just enjoy the trip while it lasts and take as many photos as possible, because, as cliché as it sounds, the time over there will go so quick.

It is important to remember that going on an overseas study tour is not just about studying the whole time. People are there to forge new friendships and experience a different culture. On this note, I challenge you to take the opportunity to study overseas if it is available to you.

What does an average day/week look like as a participant of this program?

The study tour will have the whole week planned out for you, so there is no need to worry about not knowing what to do.

In one week, there will generally be two eight hour classes and four industry visits. In between these, the week will be filled with cultural events, city tours, possibly some volunteer work and free time in the afternoon for you to explore the city on your own volition.

A typical afternoon could be spent walking the streets to find some great bargains at local markets, to eating the best traditional foods at the nearest food market, to playing indoor soccer with your mates at a local sports centre. The best thing is, you get to choose what you want to do.

While eight hours for a class may seem challenging, regular breaks are provided and the way the course is taught provides easier understanding of the content.

The industry visits are fantastic experiences and give insight into the workplaces outside of Australia. On these visits, you get to see the company/factory with a tour guide and ask all sorts of questions. The industry visits count to one weeks’ worth of mandatory workplace experience for the engineering degree, which is a great bonus.

Whether it's staying overnight at the Mekong delta or touring out to the Cu Chi tunnels, the study tour provides great cultural and historical experiences.

Going into your experience abroad, what was your biggest fear, and how did you overcome it? How did your views on the issue change?

The biggest fear I faced going into my overseas experience as an introvert was gaining independence. Throughout my life, I had grown accustomed to spending time at home with my family. I had never lived solely on my own before, and when I had gone on previous holidays, I was always with some members of my family. For the first time in my life, I was travelling to a different part of the world, just by myself, going to explore the unknown. This thought was daunting for me. Additionally, the language barrier was another small fear I had appropriated.

That thought process vanished in as little as a week into the trip. I made many new friends during the study tour through the orientation and welcome dinner, as well as group activities. The atmosphere and energy displayed by the Vietnamese local buddies at these events helped me to ignore the introvert side and to become more proactive with the other students. The local buddies taught us some fundamental Vietnamese words and phrases, and since they were with us on most activities, the language barrier was no longer an issue. Since both fears I initially had diminished, I was able to make the most of the trip and create many great memories.

How have your views/values changed after being on the SE Vietnam study tour?

The three weeks that I spent in Vietnam gave me a unique insight and greater appreciation into the world around me. Going to Vietnam has made me value the things I take for granted in Australia, such as just being able to drink clean water from the tap. I discovered that the people of Vietnam are so generous and forgiving. It was interesting to visit historical places such as the War Remnants Museum as I got to see a different perspective of the war invasion. Overall, the study tour provided me with a sense of gratification in both education and travel.

Staff Interviews

These are in-depth Q&A sessions with program leaders.

Ha Nguyen

Job Title
Program Assistant
Ha Nguyen is a recent graduate majoring in English Language Education from Vietnam National University, Hanoi. Since the first day at college, Ha has nurtured her dream of becoming an expert in the field of education. She also wishes to pursue higher education abroad to learn and experience herself how developed countries have succeeded in developing their education systems. Teaching is probably not Ha’s biggest interest, but being an education manager does sound great to her.
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What position do you hold at Student Exchange Vietnam? What has been your career path so far?

Ha: Currently, I am working as a Program Assistant at Student Exchange Vietnam whose main duties range from designing and packaging programs for international students coming to Vietnam on internship or study tour to supporting them in integration into the new life in Vienam. As mentioned above, I am interested in working as an education manager.

Particularly, my goal is to make better changes to the education system of the country, which has been considered inappropriate and not really ideal for students’ personal and professional development. What I am doing now at Student Exchange Vietnam greatly contributes to her big goal in a long term since I get the chance to work with international students coming from diverse educational backgrounds to understand more about their needs and competencies. That for sure will help me get deeper insights into what makes a strong education system in the world today.

What was your favorite traveling experience?

Ha: I am definitely into going visit new places. Before getting to work at Student Exchange Vietnam, I was involved in a similar job in an international organization named AIESEC for almost two years. Thanks to AIESEC, I got to travel to different places all over the country. Among those, the trip to Ho Chi Minh city to join the national conference of the whole AIESEC in Vietnam so far has been my most favorite.

Together with my teammates, I did experience the longest train in my life, which lasted for almost 40 hours from Hanoi to Ho Chi Minh City. It also means that for two days I had no bathing at all (laugh out loud). However, the best thing was actually about getting closer to my friends when we had deep talks to understand more about each other along the way.

What country have you always wanted to visit?

Ha: South Korea, yeah it is exactly my most favorite country in the world. In fact, I have been there oncefor a student forum, but it seems to me that it is just not enough to really enjoy the country within a week. Later when I get the chance to go back, I probably would love to stay much longer so that I can become half Korean (laugh).

I am interested in that fact that a country which has recovered from the civil war, just like my country,and now is always being endangered by the continuing war with the north, can still prosper and even greatly influence the world with Hallyu (the Korean Wave). Their strategic national branding is utmost impressive and inspiring, and raises the questions of why and how they did as well as how and when my country can do something like that.

What language have you always wanted to learn and why​?

Ha: Due to the Korean impression, I naturally fall in love with the language as an exciting aspect of the culture. I have been learning Korean for two years. Korean is not difficult to learn, especially to Vietnamese people since the rule of pronunciation is pretty much the same with Vietnamese language’s. Besides, I am very interested in writing in Korean. The alphabet is way different so there is so much fun while practicing. At first, I felt like I was drawing, but not writing.

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