IES Abroad Nice: Université Nice Sophia Antipolis

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About

Do you have advanced French language skills? Check. Are you interested in living and learning in Nice, where blue skies meet the glistening blue Mediterranean Sea, and you can enjoy French culture at its finest? Check. Want to study Political Science, Humanities, or Science alongside international and local students while learning entirely in French? Check. Then pack your bags and head to Nice, where you’ll directly enroll at Université Nice Sophia Antipolis (UNS).

Since 1965, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis has become a prestigious training and research university. UNS currently enrolls more than 26,000 students (approximately 5,000 of those are international students). When you’re not attending French language or area studies classes, get involved in the University’s many clubs, sports, and activities through their Student Network as a way to immerse yourself in the culture and get to know local and international students.

Questions & Answers

Reviews

90%
based on 3 reviews
  • Academics 7.7
  • Support 10
  • Fun 8.3
  • Housing 9.3
  • Safety 10
Showing 1 - 3 of 3
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Rachel
9/10

A Nice Way to Study

My time in Nice will forever have an impact on my life, partly shaped by IES as a program. They provided us with an orientation and resources to help us acclimate to a new situation and made sure that I was thoroughly settled in my host family and host university. During the semester they provided field trips to incredible locations I would not otherwise have gotten to visit. Our weekend trip to Corsica was one of the highlights of my semester.

Anytime I had a question about where to find the best crepes or ice cream, the center staff had the answer. When the university didn't supply the community or dance technique experience that I wanted I turned to the IES staff. They were immediately able to help me find a studio that fit my needs and open a line of communication with them.

I struggled to find my footing alone in a new culture but the IES staff was incredibly helpful and supportive whether that meant reassuring me that the experience I was having was perfectly normal or bringing me to get coffee when it was clear that what I really needed was a warm drink and a hug.

The classes I took through IES were great as well. My French class was shaped to fit us as students and accommodate our specific levels so that everyone could progress no matter where we started.

I struggled to find my footing alone in a new culture but the IES staff was incredibly helpful and supportive whether that meant reassuring me that the experience I was having was perfectly normal or bringing me to get coffee when it was clear that what I really needed was a warm drink and a hug.

I would absolutely recommend IES Nice to anyone looking for a supportive environment full of sun, ice cream and French.
I would absolutely recommend IES Nice to anyone looking for a supportive environment full of sun, ice cream and French.

How can this program be improved?
My only suggestion would be more facilitated interaction with the city around us. Outside of orientation, Thanksgiving, and one conversation partner meeting there wasn't much interaction with IES and the city. There were some complications in terms of scheduling and dealing with the university, but I know those had nothing to do with IES
Yes, I recommend this program
Default avatar
Paige
10/10

The Nice-est Place in France

I honestly had the time of my life while studying abroad through this IES program. My directors were friendly, helpful, and always encouraging. We got to learn and experience the new culture together, as well, considering I was a part of the second semester EVER to happen with IES in Nice. Through all of the twists and turns of culture shock, my directors were there--I definitely will never be able to thank them enough for that.

As for Nice itself, the city is absolutely incredible. I was never out of things to do, see, or explore, and I honestly cannot wait to go back someday. From the food to the sea to the mountains to the convenience of having an airport just a short bus ride away, Nice is the perfect location for travel bugs.

Please, don't let recent current events discourage you from coming and experiencing this amazing city. I never once felt unsafe while there, in fact, I felt safer than being at home in most cases!

Yes, I recommend this program
Default avatar
Lizzie
8/10

My Quest for Crêpes: A Crêst

I want to share one of my favorite stories from my time abroad in Nice. It encapsulates a lot of my favorite things about Niçois/French culture: crêpes, the North African influence in the south of France, and a good old-fashioned scavenger hunt. Ok, the last one wasn't specific to French culture, but that's not important.
Here is my story.

During my last week in Nice, my friend Meredith came to visit! We had a wonderful week catching up on each other’s study abroad experiences, and I had the pleasure of being able to show her firsthand what the highlights of my life in France have been.

She also arrived with a short list of things of French things she wanted to do. One of the biggest items on this list was to have a proper French crêpe. Being in a homestay, I’ve had crêpes a few times this semester, but only at home and never at a crêperie. In short, I didn’t really know where the best places were for crêpes. There was one restaurant near my apartment that advertised 1 savory crêpe + 1 dessert crêpe + 1 cup of cider as a package deal.

PERFECT RIGHT.

But no, because why would it be easy to find crêpes in France?

Day 1 of the crêst:

Saturday.

We were coming back from Antibes by train in the evening, and by the time we got back it was getting late. On top of that, I got turned around because I am me and knowing where I am is a challenge, ok? We got to the restaurant at about 10pm, by which time it was closed. However, the North African restaurant across the street was open, bless their hearts. Hungry stomachs are the real rulers so we gave up the crêst for the night and gave in to…Algerian pizza. Don’t ask. I still don’t know. But it was good so who cares!

Day 2 of the crêst:

Sunday.

An important part of French culture is their burning need to close everything on Sundays. So, after coming back from the honey festival in a neighboring town, we tried one more time to get crêpes at the same restaurant. But, you guessed it! It’s closed on Sundays. Do you know which places to eat are open on Sundays? Kebab places. Do you know which kebab places have crêpes? None of them. But who decided to advertise that they have crêpes? A kebab place.

Well, just to make sure, I asked the proprietor if they served savory crêpes and he seemed very sincere when he said, “Yes, with egg and cheese.” Perfect, sounds like a crêpe to me!

After much anticipation, we were served…tortillas. I kid you not, our Sunday dinner was closer to a breakfast burrito than a crêpe. Granted, it wasn’t bad, but when I ask directly for a crêpe, I mean I would like to eat a crêpe.

Day 3 of the crêst:

Monday.

After 2 failed attempts, I didn’t want to take my chances. I asked my friend Austin who I know has eaten out more often than I have as he lives in his own apartment in Nice. He gave me a great recommendation for a crêperie on the port. Meredith and I both ordered delicious crêpes. (She got a ham and cheese savory crêpe and a Grand Marnier dessert crêpe; I got a ham and cheese savory crêpe and a blueberry jam dessert crêpe.)

The struggles like this are some of the most memorable experiences from a semester abroad and our crêst is one of my favorite memories from the semester. I mean, when we’re eating good food either way, can we really complain?

- See more at: http://www.iesabroad.org/study-abroad/blogs/micha562umnedu/…

Yes, I recommend this program

About IES Abroad

IES Abroad offers 140 programs worldwide for college students. We are a highly charged force of study abroad enthusiasts. Every day we have the privilege of witnessing how study abroad changes our students’ lives. We also believe that every student...