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HESS International Educational Group

About

BE MORE THAN A TEACHER. BE AN INSPIRATION!
Choose a career that opens up a world of new cultures, unique people, and wonderful travel opportunities.

ABOUT US:
Founded in 1983, HESS International Educational Group is the largest and most recognized private language school in Taiwan. We employ more than 600 native English-speaking teachers in 180+ HESS schools across Asia. Our staff has more than 30 years of experience looking after both new and experienced teachers just like you!

At HESS, you’ll work directly with a stable, well-established educational organization. We are not a recruitment agency, and we do not charge any fees. Take the first steps toward teaching English in Asia today!

Website
www.hess.com.tw
Founded
1983

Reviews

David Potgieter
David
7/10

I have read several reviews that criticize the unpaid work hours that you will have to put in. It is true, you will not be paid for a good portion of work hours spent preparing, grading or doing some minor chores. I'd like to stress that this is *typically* the case in virtually all teaching jobs, globally.

The pay per hour is more than fair. The benefits (health insurance being the flagship) that you will derive from holding a work permit are pretty much unrivaled. There are several *optional* sightseeing tours and events revolving around food that you will be treated to.

The experience of being thrust into a new cultural world is jarring and shocking for a time, but ultimately highly rewarding and character forming. Many reviewers here have highlighted the difficulty of the job not realizing that jobs are, generally speaking, tough. This is not meant to be a holiday, it is a job.

How can this program be improved?
Many teachers who arrive in Taiwan to work for Hess are teaching for the very first time. For these teachers it would help if the reality of what it means to teach and facilitate children (many of whom are naturally highly unruly) was made very clear at the outset.
Yes, I recommend
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Sebastian
1/10

Hess will give you a good training in the basics of esl teaching. They will.always pay you on time. The kids are great and some of the branch staff are friendly. They paid for taxi from the airport
Helped find an apartment, Good way to meet new people.

HESS takes advantage of foreign teachers in a weak position. You will spend more than half of your time doing completely unpaid work. The amount of extra "activities" are frankly absurd. You will only get one day off per week. Expect 50-60 hour work weeks but only 20-25 hours of pay. There are ZERO paid days off. None. And it is very difficult to get time off because you, the employee, will have to find your own subs.

HESS does not hesitate to use scare tactics to unsuspecting foreign teachers. For example, threatening to fire you to get a "better performance" (even if they have no intention of doing so). Keep in mind that getting fired also means losing your residence visa!
Last thing to say: HESS recruits entirely from abroad. This is because their reputation is so bad that NO teachers in Taiwan are willing to work them. None.

How can this program be improved?
Be more transparent with incoming teachers, and more people would stay and complete their contracts.
No, I don't recommend
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Adam
2/10

I was a teacher at Hess for 1 year. I left because the CTs boss new NSTs around. There is a lot of unpaid work. And because of the larger number of teachers who quit you will be made to teach whatever classes they tell you to. You will be working 6 days a week and then have to grade homework, tests, quizzes and progress reports. All this is outside of your lessons and NOT paid.

If you teach kindy and then EFL/Treehouse you will be working 9am to 9pm. The kids are great and the material is good. They also say western management, in many cases the Head Chinese teacher HCT. Will be your manager not a Head Native Speaking Teacher, because nobody wants to do the job.

This causes problems and friction. Most of the time if there is an issue in class then they will side with the Chinese Teacher and not the foreign teacher.

The training that they are supposed to give to CTs (Chinese Teachers) is only for full time ones. All the part time teachers don't get this. And so many are aggressive to new NSTs, they will also interrupt teaching and undermined you in front of the students.

If you are looking for a job, they will offer one to you. The interview is easy and they need teachers, due to the high labor turnover.

How can this program be improved?
Be consistent with your policies. Don't lie in training. The picture painted is not the reality. Also don't try and cover up the bad practices.
No, I don't recommend
Jamie
10/10

I know it's a while back, but I taught for four years 2006-2010 and had the best time. I'm from London and was 25 at the time. The training was great, the schools were fun and pay was good too. It was harder in the first 18 months, but once you get it, and settle, Taiwain and teaching is amazing. The school really encourages students to speak (and sing) as much as possible, and i found that by age 6 (post 3 years in Kindy) a lot were almost fluent. Such a great experience, that I look back on with such foundness.

How can this program be improved?
it's great!
Yes, I recommend
Default avatar
Tim
7/10

Let's start with the positive/useful things about this job.
As someone who had never taught before, this was a valuable experience. The initial training was really good (although you learn a lot more as you actually teach, obviously). The syllabus and lesson plans are provided, so you don't have to stress too much about that. The lesson plans are quite rigid which is a good thing if you're new, but there's always room for your own creativity. Your co-teachers will generally be very supportive and patient as long as you listen to them and make the effort to improve. After a year or more, you'll feel really confident in teaching and would have gained valuable skills and experience which would allow you to qualify for higher-paying EFL jobs.

Now for the main irritations of working here.

Follow-up Training and Random Branch Training:
Quarterly trainings over the first year took place during my teaching hours, so I had to make up those lessons by doing double lessons or find a substitute which wasn't always possible. I ended up teaching for 9 hours solid because of that! Some of those trainings could have been replaced with a powerpoint presentation or video demonstration anyway- far cheaper and convenient.

Disappearing Colleagues and the $20000 Fine:
Some people find they don't like the job and want to leave within the first year. Although there is a 1 month notice period so Hess can find a replacement, these people leave suddenly. Why? Because there's a NT20 000 fine for leaving during your first year. If you leave suddenly, no one can trace you. Therefore they leave without notice, and you have to take your share of their hours. Some of us ended up with 36 teaching hours a week for several months!

Time-sheets:
You have to do quite a bit of clerical work like filling in your own time-sheets every month (wtf, can't they just use our updated schedules to see out how many hours we worked?). If you don't fill them out you won't get paid.

Materials for Crafts:
For kindergarten or holiday lessons, you need to order the materials for the arts and crafts. Even though you ask for it a week in advance, you only get the materials right before the lesson. How am I supposed to test/demo the craft in time? I got so fed up that I began buying the materials myself (they weren't expensive) and prepared at home during the weekend.

Hourly pay:
You will get paid by the hour without any paid leave whatsoever. If you can't teach for any reason, you won't get paid. Even if your class gets cancelled because of Chinese New Year/ natural disasters/you get hit by a car. That's stated in your contract, but it's annoying nonetheless.

Monthly Reports:
At the end of each month, you have to provide a report on the learning situation of your classes including your goals, objectives, concerns and ideas for improving those concerns. This just adds to the already heavy workload and responsibility.

Overall I enjoyed my experience here. The pay and support is great for a first timer. Co-workers are generally very supportive, some students will remain in your heart forever and the Taiwanese people are really kind and friendly. You can make good friends here. But learn to take criticism (you WILL be criticized, even in class! It took me a while to get used to that). You will have good and bad days just like with any job.

Good luck!

Yes, I recommend

Programs

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