Teach in Taiwan with HESS International Educational Group
53% Rating
(27 Reviews)

Teach in Taiwan with HESS International Educational Group

BE MORE THAN A TEACHER. BE AN INSPIRATION!
Choose a career that opens up a world of new cultures, unique people, and wonderful travel opportunities.

ABOUT US:
Founded in 1983, HESS International Educational Group is the largest and most recognized private language school in Taiwan. We employ more than 600 native English-speaking teachers in 180+ HESS schools across Asia. Our staff has more than 30 years of experience looking after both new and experienced teachers just like you!

At HESS, you’ll work directly with a stable, well-established educational organization. We are not a recruitment agency, and we do not charge any fees. Take the first steps toward teaching English in Asia today!

Visit www.hess.com.tw for more information and to apply online.

WHAT SETS HESS APART?

1. FREE TEFL CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAM: Teachers earn a HESS TEFL Certificate after completing our intensive, 120+ hour training program. Both new and experienced educators are welcome!

2. BENEFITS AND ASSISTANCE: HESS has more than 30 years of experience handling documents and healthcare for foreign teachers. We also provide free airport pick-up, hotel stay, and assistance finding housing (flight and housing reimbursement offered in some locations).

3. INTEREST-FREE START-UP LOAN: We offer an interest-free loan to help you get settled into your new home and career.

4. SUPPORT AND JOB SECURITY: Train in a large group to make friends and find roommates. Our schools also have a reliable Western management structure and ongoing training, communication, and feedback.

5. MORE OPTIONS: We offer full-time English-teaching positions at 180+ HESS schools across Asia, and we are able to accommodate couples and friends applying together. We also hire year-round for various start dates, so you can start teaching on a timeframe that suits you.

6. COMPETITIVE PAY AND BONUSES: Earn enough to save money and live comfortably. Pay off loans or fund your travel adventures. Your teaching pay is complimented by yearly bonuses.

7. GUARANTEED HOURS: We guarantee a minimum number of teaching hours above what most schools can offer so you always know what your base income will be. There are plenty of opportunities to earn more by picking up extra classes or activities.

8. FLEXIBLE TIME OFF: Flexible vacation days and annual leave between contracts give you endless opportunities to explore.

9. MATERIALS PROVIDED: We write our own professional, award-winning curricula with lesson plans made for you. Class sizes are manageable, and local co-teachers will support you inside and outside of the classroom.

10. ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Teaching contracts can be renewed annually. We also offer roles in curriculum writing, management, training, marketing, recruiting, multimedia, and more!

Locations
Asia » Taiwan » Taipei
Asia » Taiwan » Taidong
Asia » Taiwan » Taichung
Asia » Taiwan » Kaohsiung
Asia » Taiwan » Hualien
Teaching Practicum
No
Training Type
Classroom
Training Length
120hours
Job Placement
No
Starting Price
$0.00
Currency
USD
Other Locations
Hualien

Questions & Answers

You can still apply to work with HESS, but you will have to have the certificate by the time you come to Taiwan. Let your "Overseas Advisor" know your situation.

Program Reviews

  • Benefits
    52%
  • Support
    61%
  • Fun
    65%
  • Facilities
    57%
  • Safety
    76%
  • Instruction
    45%
  • Support
    20%
  • Value
    30%
  • Difficulty
    30%
  • Job Assistance
    25%

Program Reviews (27)

Default avatar
Sebastian
Male
29 years old
Taipei
University of Birmingham

Don't risk it - Avoid

1/10

Hess will give you a good training in the basics of esl teaching. They will.always pay you on time. The kids are great and some of the branch staff are friendly. They paid for taxi from the airport
Helped find an apartment, Good way to meet new people.

HESS takes advantage of foreign teachers in a weak position. You will spend more than half of your time doing completely unpaid work. The amount of extra "activities" are frankly absurd. You will only get one day off per week. Expect 50-60 hour work weeks but only 20-25 hours of pay. There are ZERO paid days off. None. And it is very difficult to get time off because you, the employee, will have to find your own subs.

HESS does not hesitate to use scare tactics to unsuspecting foreign teachers. For example, threatening to fire you to get a "better performance" (even if they have no intention of doing so). Keep in mind that getting fired also means losing your residence visa!
Last thing to say: HESS recruits entirely from abroad. This is because their reputation is so bad that NO teachers in Taiwan are willing to work them. None.

How can this program be improved?

Be more transparent with incoming teachers, and more people would stay and complete their contracts.

Default avatar
Adam
Male
32 years old
Manchester
Keele University

Former NST

2/10

I was a teacher at Hess for 1 year. I left because the CTs boss new NSTs around. There is a lot of unpaid work. And because of the larger number of teachers who quit you will be made to teach whatever classes they tell you to. You will be working 6 days a week and then have to grade homework, tests, quizzes and progress reports. All this is outside of your lessons and NOT paid.

If you teach kindy and then EFL/Treehouse you will be working 9am to 9pm. The kids are great and the material is good. They also say western management, in many cases the Head Chinese teacher HCT. Will be your manager not a Head Native Speaking Teacher, because nobody wants to do the job.

This causes problems and friction. Most of the time if there is an issue in class then they will side with the Chinese Teacher and not the foreign teacher.

The training that they are supposed to give to CTs (Chinese Teachers) is only for full time ones. All the part time teachers don't get this. And so many are aggressive to new NSTs, they will also interrupt teaching and undermined you in front of the students.

If you are looking for a job, they will offer one to you. The interview is easy and they need teachers, due to the high labor turnover.

How can this program be improved?

Be consistent with your policies. Don't lie in training. The picture painted is not the reality. Also don't try and cover up the bad practices.

Jamie
Male

I had the best time in Yong He

10/10

I know it's a while back, but I taught for four years 2006-2010 and had the best time. I'm from London and was 25 at the time. The training was great, the schools were fun and pay was good too. It was harder in the first 18 months, but once you get it, and settle, Taiwain and teaching is amazing. The school really encourages students to speak (and sing) as much as possible, and i found that by age 6 (post 3 years in Kindy) a lot were almost fluent. Such a great experience, that I look back on with such foundness.

How can this program be improved?

it's great!

Default avatar
Tim
Male
29 years old
Durban

Great for Beginner Teachers!

7/10

Let's start with the positive/useful things about this job.
As someone who had never taught before, this was a valuable experience. The initial training was really good (although you learn a lot more as you actually teach, obviously). The syllabus and lesson plans are provided, so you don't have to stress too much about that. The lesson plans are quite rigid which is a good thing if you're new, but there's always room for your own creativity. Your co-teachers will generally be very supportive and patient as long as you listen to them and make the effort to improve. After a year or more, you'll feel really confident in teaching and would have gained valuable skills and experience which would allow you to qualify for higher-paying EFL jobs.

Now for the main irritations of working here.

Follow-up Training and Random Branch Training:
Quarterly trainings over the first year took place during my teaching hours, so I had to make up those lessons by doing double lessons or find a substitute which wasn't always possible. I ended up teaching for 9 hours solid because of that! Some of those trainings could have been replaced with a powerpoint presentation or video demonstration anyway- far cheaper and convenient.

Disappearing Colleagues and the $20000 Fine:
Some people find they don't like the job and want to leave within the first year. Although there is a 1 month notice period so Hess can find a replacement, these people leave suddenly. Why? Because there's a NT20 000 fine for leaving during your first year. If you leave suddenly, no one can trace you. Therefore they leave without notice, and you have to take your share of their hours. Some of us ended up with 36 teaching hours a week for several months!

Time-sheets:
You have to do quite a bit of clerical work like filling in your own time-sheets every month (wtf, can't they just use our updated schedules to see out how many hours we worked?). If you don't fill them out you won't get paid.

Materials for Crafts:
For kindergarten or holiday lessons, you need to order the materials for the arts and crafts. Even though you ask for it a week in advance, you only get the materials right before the lesson. How am I supposed to test/demo the craft in time? I got so fed up that I began buying the materials myself (they weren't expensive) and prepared at home during the weekend.

Hourly pay:
You will get paid by the hour without any paid leave whatsoever. If you can't teach for any reason, you won't get paid. Even if your class gets cancelled because of Chinese New Year/ natural disasters/you get hit by a car. That's stated in your contract, but it's annoying nonetheless.

Monthly Reports:
At the end of each month, you have to provide a report on the learning situation of your classes including your goals, objectives, concerns and ideas for improving those concerns. This just adds to the already heavy workload and responsibility.

Overall I enjoyed my experience here. The pay and support is great for a first timer. Co-workers are generally very supportive, some students will remain in your heart forever and the Taiwanese people are really kind and friendly. You can make good friends here. But learn to take criticism (you WILL be criticized, even in class! It took me a while to get used to that). You will have good and bad days just like with any job.

Good luck!

Patrick
Male
28 years old
Panglao, Bohol, Philippines

Realistic and working abroad in Asia

9/10

I have lived in Asia for the past 6 years, and I'm no stranger to culture shock. Every country is different. That being said- what are your goals, and why you are wanting to work abroad. As most people understand any job has its pros and cons. Now add cultural differences to the mix. I would consider myself to be level-headed and realistic. I have enjoyed my time with HESS and have gained a lot of experience as a teacher. Overall, I don't have any complaints about HESS. By biggest advice for people is to BE FLEXIBLE. If you find this to be difficult then you will have difficulty. I think it is important for you to know that you will not know your teaching location until the end of training- this was the most difficult thing for many of my co-trainees to get used to. Just remember, have faith in the system. The staff is actually looking out for your best interest. They will try their best to place you where you will succeed.
There was a big adjustment going from Taipei training conditions to my rural area, DaJia Taichung, but after a few weeks I seemed to adjust fine.
HESS tries their best to prepare you financially. Take their advice seriously. I brought with me 1000 USD and I took out the interest free of NT30000. I managed to survive alright by the time I received my first paycheck. REMEMBER to save while you are in Taipei. Don't spend all your money!
I advise you to read the other reviews and think about this decision seriously. Is HESS for everyone? No, it isn't, BUT I have thoroughly enjoyed my time, and will be renewing my contract.
STAY FLEXIBLE and PATIENT. Taiwan is a great, safe place!

Default avatar
Brendan
Male
34 years old
Nairn
University of Aberdeen

Not great to be honest... You can do better!

4/10

My girlfriend and I decided to work for Hess as it seemed like a safe option and they seemed very reasonable after our initial experience with the HR process. Sadly, we found that the positive experiences with them do not extend much further than this.

The HR team are mostly great and the training is really thorough (if not a bit intense). This experience sets a really professional tone to the company which actually stretches no further than this for a number of key reasons.

Firstly, Hess will make you do a lot of unpaid work. This can amount to almost as much work as you get paid for. There are a vast array of employers in Taiwan which will not make teachers do unpaid work and the amount of marking and admin can be mind-bending and soul-destroying at times. Particularly if you have large, upper-level classes. Hess offer bonuses for retaining these large classes as an incentive for this work but in comparison to the amount of extra work this involves over a year, the bonuses are frankly miserable!

Also, Hess will charge you a fee if you break your one-year contract. If you choose to fight this, it will prove an ugly and unpleasant process for those who stand their ground. This is something that very few employers in Taiwan do. Many language schools will not even bind teachers to a contract.

I simply had a terrible time at the branch I was placed in. I worked twice as many Saturday hours as any other NST (native speaking teacher) - working all day, while others had Saturday free. I was also the only NST who worked late each day from Monday to Friday. This did not give me much free time, was not similar to my girlfriend's schedule and made me very unhappy. I endured this for nearly ten months of a year-long contract before some small changes were made to my schedule for my final two months of employment.

I also found that I had little or no support during my struggle, as there was no head NST at our branch. In addition, I found the response of upper level staff to be quite dismissive of my concerns by simply stating 'you signed the contract'. This is a mealy-mouthed and jobs worthy response to an employee's occupational health concerns. I was also lied to by a senior manager during discussion of my aggrevance in order to strengthen her position on the matter! My advice would be not to consider one of their contracts considering the potential outcome and the lack of compassion and decency extended.

To give you further context on this issue I should inform you that I am a man in my thirties who has worked full-time for well over a decade in a number of roles for various companies. I have not taken a single day of sickness absence in over a decade -despite a number of broken bones - and have never been informed of any issues with my working attitude. Quite the opposite in fact, I have received awards and commendations from most companies I have worked with. When I worked with Hess, I was informed that the issues I experienced were simply due to culture shock and differences in working environments and that all of my issues resulted from a poor attitude. In this case, I am pretty confident that my working record speaks for itself and that the problem lies elsewhere!

It's easy to lack confidence when making such a large move across the world to live and work in a foreign country. It is very daunting and the secured prospect of working for a giant company like Hess can be comforting. However, I can simply inform you that the language teaching market in Taiwan is ripe for the picking and if you just have faith in yourself to find a job out there you'll find a role with better pay and conditions with significantly less unpaid work. I know a number of people who enjoyed their first year with Hess, and a couple which stayed for a second year. However, with such a variation in experiences and the risk of suffering from a company's unfair practices, I would simply advise that you seek employment elsewhere on arrival.

Believe in yourself and you can find something far superior in an incredible country, even with no prior experience. I wish you the best of luck with this and hope my opinion has been of assistance to you!

Default avatar
Scott
Male
30 years old
Hsinchu, Taiwan
Mercyhurst College

I worked at Hess in Hsinchu

4/10

I worked for Hess in Hsinchu from June 2015 to February 2016. Hess is a big chain, they help you come overseas and get acquainted with Taiwan before you start teaching. They'll help you find a place to live and get you working permits. That's the good part. They don't really tell you how much you really need to get started. It's a lot and don't expect a paycheck until 2 months after you get here. The 183 days 18% tax and 182 days 5% tax was not accurate at my school. I was always getting hit with 18% tax. Other schools don't pull this on unknowing foreign teachers. Other schools will also pay you more and let you teach or substitute at other schools. Though many want you to have some sort of certificate showing you know what you're doing. I don't really recommend Hess to anyone that wants to teach seriously in Taiwan. There are much better schools available. Hess is just a giant corporation with very high turnover, even with the hefty contract termination fee. It's not for everyone, but it is at least a way to get started here in Taiwan if you're willing to wait a year to find a serious teaching position.

Default avatar
Craig
Male
36 years old
Taipei, Taiwan

A good option for 1st time teachers.

9/10

HESS provides you with a lot of support in and outside the classroom. This makes it easy to adapt to living in a foreign country and learn more about teaching.

Lesson plans are provided making your introduction into teaching easier. You will be well supported by head teachers, area managers and the main office.

There are many social events and events organised by the organisation to help you network with other teachers.

If you are willing to work hard, you are able to make a very good wage and live well in Taiwan.

How can this program be improved?

Due to living in a foreign country there are some cultural differences that teachers find hard to adapt to, but with time and patience things improve.

Default avatar
d
Male
50 years old
uk
City University London

The worst employer I ever had

1/10

I worked for Hess and without doubt they are ten times worse in my opinion it is alleged than any other company I have worked in in any other country. I would never recommend anyone work for them ever!! Even my worst enemy.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

We are very sorry to hear you had a bad experience working with us. We are the first to admit that we are not the right fit for everyone. We do our best to make the realities of working for us as clear as possible in the recruitment process so that people are aware of our values and expectations and so they can decide, prior to signing any contract, if we are the right fit for them.

Unfortunately, you have not stated what was the causes of your frustrations. One thing we strive for is to take feedback and try to improve our systems and approaches.

We are proud that our company offers many layers of support, at the school level, the area level and from the Head Office. If any staff feel they are not getting the support or feel the employee guidelines and policy book (which are give to all employees and available online) are not being followed, they can speak to their Head Teacher, their Branch Manager, their Area Manager or the Human Resources Department.

I do hope you can let me know your specific issues that you faced so that I can look at them and see what improvements can be made moving forward. Please contact me at [email protected]

Default avatar
Sharon
Female
32 years old
Iowa

Taiwanese staff can be disrespectful and ruin your teaching experience

5/10

Are you a reasonably clean cut, complacent, semi-decent looking Caucasian male in your late 20s to early 30s? Congratulations, you are Hess material. You will likely encounter few problems while working with the Taiwanese staff at your buxiban. I would recommend this company to you solely on the basis of lack of teaching experience and few contacts in Taiwan. Keep in mind the possibility of 6 day work weeks, and being your branches go-to man for underpaid extracurricular work.

Now, if you don't belong to this minority, you may run into some issues. If the staff at your buxiban decide for some reason that they don't like who you are on the basis of your appearance, your personality, your ethnicity, your teaching style, etc, then you may have a difficult time. Poor relationships with the staff can be extremely stressful and make working with Hess a nightmare. This is of course subjective, and each branch is different, but micromanagement and internal hostility seem to be a recurring theme in many Hess buxibans.
Head office is aware of these issues, but unfortunately can do very little to change things.

If you are lucky enough to have a good experience with Hess, then you are of the minority. Life in Taiwan is of course what you make of it, but having an enjoyable job will make all the difference.
There are other cram schools which pay a higher starting wage, and give less extra admin work. Don't settle for Hess.

Default avatar
Riley
Female
Orem, Utah
Utah State University

Poor experience. Hess illegaly sends teachers over to work.

3/10

Where to begin?

Well, first of all, my branch is pretty decent. The managers were helpful, and the staff was something that I could work with. Also, the kids were great. The issue I had was the HESS structure itself. They work you into the ground, especially if you teach kindy with a mix of treehouse classes. You're only paid for your time in class, but your time grading and doing administrative work is way more. According to the Labor Standard Act in Taiwan (read it before you sign any contract), andy buxibon company is only allowed to work you a certain number of hours a day, and the days you are clocked in are the days that you are legally allowed to be compensated for. Out of a whopping 10 hour work day (including grading, lesson prep, etc) you are only paid for 4 or 6 of those hours (depending on how many classes you actually teach). You even have to put on extra Kindy performance shows, which the rediculous amount of prep time for the show isn't compensated for at all. Also, it is the law to have employees paid for national Taiwanese Holidays, according to Article 39. Guess what? HESS doesn't pay you for any international holiday. I'm actually planning to go to the labor board about this. HESS has gotten away with so many illegal practices, I feel partly to blame because I didn't research what my rights were.

I terminated my contract early due to a family emergency, and in the contract you agreed to a 20,000 termination fee. First of all, it is ILLEGAL to work as a kindy teacher in Taiwan, and you figure this out AFTER you sign the contract. What bugs me even more is that HESS attempted to deduct my wages from my paycheck, which is black and white illegal, and can open them up to a civil suit and get them fined 90,000 NT. The reason they didn't is because I researched my rights as an employee. Needless to say, I didn't pay the fine even after much intimidation and coercieon by my HNST to make me sign another contract promising I'll pay some other amount of NT.

HESS has a reputation of overworking and underpaying its employees, and if you're not careful, they will nickel and dime you. They have left a really bad taste in my mouth after all of this. I'm glad to be done with them. It's no coincidence that they have such a high turnover rate and they have issues retaining empoloyees.

Default avatar
Marc
Male
24 years old
Yaiean
Portland State University

Not the worst but definitely not the best

2/10

Your first experience with Hess is the training which is everyday for one week and change. It is generally not that helpful because it is not specific to the place you will be teaching at which run however the manager feels it should. The degree to which the contract you sign and the policies outlined at the main office are followed varies a lot from branch to branch. In my experience many branches underpay for events. Also I have had a few "accounting errors" which surprisingly have never been in my favor.

Hess generally pays less than the going rate for teachers. They also expect you to do a lot more work outside of class than other jobs in Taiwan. You may have a little leverage if you complain depending on how many teachers have quit recently, but usually managers are willing to fight for pennies from you no matter the long term costs.

They have a main office staff of foreigners but they don't have the power to really help you. They seem well meaning enough though, and they will at least listen and then tell you to talk to someone else.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your feedback. We do take our company policies very serious. If there are ever any questions or concerns, they can be raised with the branch management, the area management or the Main Office. If policy is not being followed, then it will be addressed.

If you have any specific feedback, please feel free to contact us at [email protected]

We pride ourselves at being legitimate and honest, if there were any "accounting errors" made, then please accept our apology for them and I am sure they were quickly rectified as that is not ever intentional and do not happen often. They would have definitely been an honest mistake. We do have systems in place to avoid any errors, but of course no system is perfect, but we do our best to make sure our staff are always paid on time and correctly.

Default avatar
Disappointed
Female
32 years old
Tainan City, Taiwan
Other

You shouldn't base working here on whether the "environment is fun."

4/10

First and foremost, I love Taiwan. I want to stay here; it is brilliant and amazing. I love where I live, I love the local area and the people. My review reflects none of that because -- and I wish I could underline the rest of this sentence -- that shouldn't be the consideration you have when working for Hess.

Focusing entirely on the program: It's only (and barely) adequate if you've never taught a day in your life and have absolutely zero experience; the materials are poorly edited, and this includes both student books and teacher manuals. There are points where the grammar is absolutely incorrect and the examples are glaringly wrong; the materials contain highly inappropriate "in-jokes" that shouldn't even exist. There are countless references to subtle racism (black children going to the police station, poor representations of the Rroma as 'crystal-ball carrying gypsies,' caveman-inspired Native Americans), drugs (a girl is holding a flower that looks exactly like a marijuana leaf), alcohol, age inappropriate word choices for teaching phonics.

There is far too much work for the time allowed, and you're expected to get through all of it. There are activities that are incredibly pointless for the time given to them, and you're questioned if you skip something in favour of doing a different activity. I prefer to incorporate more speaking in my classes, as this is something most of my students need more practice with. However, as I'm expected to get through all the low-grade secretarial work provided in order to "prove" I've "effectively taught" my students, there isn't a lot of time to incorporate discussion and questioning.

When I'm teaching, my co-teachers commonly interrupt me. Sometimes it's about class behaviour, which I can handle. The moment the most minor infraction occurs, my teachers are up and shouting at my students. If I'm in the middle of teaching something, they always question me. I had a lesson about using past continuous tense; the instructions stated that students should be using past continuous tense, and my co-teacher kept insisting that we should be using "simple past tense" regardless of how many times I pointed out that the instructions stated "past continuous" and that answering all questions using past continuous would make sense. Rather than waiting until after class and discussing this, it was determined that the best time for an argument over instructions was during class time and in front of the students.

The training that is provided is minimal and inadequate. They constantly pull you in for trainings on various things that do nothing more than waste time; they could easily email you the videos and PowerPoints they plan to show you, as those are the only thing they will ever reference. More than half of your questions will be answered with the phrase: "Check the teachers manual" or "Ask your branch." Both of which are problematic when your branch doesn't know.

Their pay is lower than average, too. It's not bad, and a person can obviously live on it; it's just lower than the going standard.

Two more things to consider, as well, if you're going to work with Hess:

1. They won't tell you until nearing the end of training what the legal status is about working in kindergartens. It's a changeable law that is a grey area, but it is currently illegal; depending on the capricious nature of the inspectors (and even your school), you really need to be aware of its legal status and avoid being caught if you're currently teaching children in that age bracket. Seriously.

2. If you're looking at Hess for a cheap alternative to a TEFL certification, you're being silly. Their TEFL is not accredited by any university/program (as they cannot afford the costs of going to an English-speaking university?). They state that it may be useful but will not always be accepted, but they sort of neglect mentioning this directly in their propaganda for new recruits.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

We appreciate your feedback and welcome it, thank you. While we respect that you have your systems and ideas about how to teach effectively, and your own judgement on what are the needs of your students, you do need to understand that the materials taught in our schools serve two purposes:
1. To improve the student's confidence and joy of learning through making learning fun and giving them the opportunity to practice listening, speaking, reading and writing.
2. The students need to be prepared to take government required English tests known as the GEPT. So, there are some aspects of the materials that may seem unnatural to how you might say them, but they match what is the required answer on these tests.

This is one of the challenges of learning to teach in a new country, is that we sometimes need to accept that we may not have all the information and have to respect that others may have a better understanding of the specific needs of our students.

We have been in the English education market in Taiwan for over 30 years and we have a dedicated team of writers who are well versed on the government tests, thus our materials are specifically made to meet those requirements. We understand that this may not be the right fit for everyone, but we are meeting the needs of our students, which is the most important thing.

Once again that you for your feedback.

Default avatar
Shoshana
Female
32 years old
Dallas, Tx
Western Michigan University

Wo ai Taiwan! (I love Taiwan!)

10/10

In July of 2009 I moved to Taiwan a month after graduating college. I went for a few reasons: work, travel, fun and to learn Mandarin. I was interviewed and hired before I went by Hess Educational Organization. My two years in Taiwan started off with a 2 week Hess training in the capital Taipei where we learned teaching strategies - everything from classroom management to how to explain adjectives. This was a great time to adjust to the time changed, make friends and learn about the culture all while being housed in a nice hotel and fed 2 free meals a day. I made friendships those first two weeks that I still have today. After training I moved to the port city of Keelung where I moved into an adorable, small Japanese style studio apartment and started teaching ESL. I started out teaching at Hess's kindergarten in the mornings and teaching elementary and junior higher school students in the evenings. A typical day involved riding my scooter to kindergarten - teaching 3 year olds for 2 1/2 hours then having lunch with my fellow teachers (usually something made by the kindy aunties - delicious Taiwanese food). Teaching kindy was really fun in the sense that we were really involved in every aspect of the kids' education, from teaching them phonics to teaching them how to clean up and how to be polite. I taught the same kids two years in a row and it was so amazing to watch them grow up. By the time I left they were 4 and 5 and could speak English really well. It's also challenging teaching the younger kids though, it takes a lot of patience, and sometimes it seems like the kids have better relationships with their Chinese speaking teachers (which makes sense of course). I enjoyed teaching the older kids as well, although teaching till 8:30 at night was not on my list of favorite things. The older kids really appreciate learning from a native speaking teaching and while you have a pretty strict curriculum to follow there is always time to share your culture and get to know your students and their culture.

Hess as a whole was a really supportive school. I would definitely recommend Hess to any one starting out teaching abroad. They offer a lot of support such as finding an apartment and helping with necessary but very difficult tasks, like setting up a bank account, filing taxes and going to the dentist. The Taiwanese teachers we worked with were awesome too, they were really helpful in and out of the classroom.

I loved my experience in Taiwan. A huge reason I went was to study Mandarin and live in an Asian country. I made some amazing friends - the Taiwanese people are some of the nicest people I've ever met in my life. They are so welcoming and love sharing about their country. The city I stayed in was just the right size, big enough to never get bored, small enough that you became familiar with the area and people pretty quickly. There was a cafe called Leaf Cafe in Keelung where I befriended the owner of the cafe. Of all my experiences in Taiwan - studying Mandarin at the Normal Taiwan University, going to glorious Green Island, lasting through a Typhoon, experiencing Lantern Festival (and ALL the other festivals), going out in Taipei - the thing I am thankful for the most is that little cafe and all the wonderful memories there. When you travel it's hard not to feel like you have to be living on the edge every single day, seeing new places, trying new foods, meeting new people, but at the end of the day that gets pretty exhausting especially when you're living and working somewhere for an extended period of time. By the end of my two years in Keelung I was so thankful for my curry place where the owners knew my favorite dish, for the comfort of having friends nearby, for my faithful scooter that gave me freedom to explore, and for a beautiful, ancient culture that will always be a part of me.

How can this program be improved?

No one should have to go to school (or teach) on a Saturday. Taiwanese people have crazy work ethics, but teaching on Saturdays is exhausting for everyone, I would would've definitely changed that if i could have.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you so much for sharing your experience. It sounds like you really took advantage of your opportunities while you were here.

We are doing our best to adjust our schedules to limit having early and late classes on the same day, and limiting our Saturday classes. They are still a reality of teaching in Taiwan, but they are becoming more the exception than the norm.

Once again, great to hear you had such positive experience!

Default avatar
Chad
Male
32 years old
Taipei, Taiwan
Stephen F. Austin State University

Working for four years!

9/10

I have been working for Hess for almost four years and it has been a great experience. Taiwan is so conveniently located in Asia that it allows you to travel easily between many countries on the cheap. Also this company does quite a bit to ensure that you are looked after once you arrive. I would say that most peoples biggest gripe about Hess is its large size and the feeling of working in a middle sized corporation. Overall it is a good company, but Taiwan is the real reason to come. This island is truly beautiful!

How can this program be improved?

Some stream lining of corporate bureaucracy would go a long way...

Response from HESS International Educational Group

We are happy to hear you having a great experience here. Yes, Taiwan is an amazing place to live.

No company is perfect, there are pluses and minuses working at small, middle or large companies. That being said, we are proud that we do review our processes every year to see how we can be better. We take the time to talk to our teachers, our mangers and our clients to hear different perspectives on how the company can be improved and we take actions to improve.

Default avatar
Caroline
Female
32 years old
Madison, Wisconsin
Wesleyan College

NST in Keelung

9/10

As an introvert, going overseas to teach during the 2009 recession was a scary prospect, but HESS did a fantastic job of making sure I was comfortable and settled. I had a fantastic time teaching kindy for two years in Keelung.

How can this program be improved?

The program would be improved by integrating more current, research-based early childhood education theories.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

It is great that you had a nice time in Keelung, it is really a nice place that offers the best of both worlds, near the ocean and not far from Taipei!

We do think it is so much more beneficial to stay two years at least, so you can really appreciate the benefits. Not only do you have a much better understanding of the culture and how to get around, you also have higher pay after you get your raise, and the bonus month vacation that allows you to explore Asia or go home.

We do try to reevaluate our curriculum every year to look at bringing in new ideas and systems for getting our students the most up to date teaching styles and methodologies. We will continue to look at bringing these ideas to our classrooms. If you have any specific feedback for your writers, please let us know at [email protected]

Thank you for your feedback.

Default avatar
Jane
Female
24 years old
Taipei, Taiwan
Lehigh University

Pros and Cons

5/10

Hess is one of the largest "cram schools" in Taiwan, and is therefore often seen as a safe bet for those looking to apply for a job in Taiwan while overseas. They conduct interviews via Skype, so for many people it's nice to have the security of a job offer before arriving in Taiwan. They also offer a 2-week (unpaid) training which can be extremely helpful for someone who has never taught before. Teaching materials are provided as well. However, your day-to-day experience as a Hess teacher might vary wildly from someone at a different branch than you. Some branches seem to be well-organized and supportive of their teachers, whereas others are definitely not.

Where I was placed, the new NSTs received almost zero support upon arriving at the branch, even in terms of basic needs like finding housing (it was promised during training that our branch would help us find appropriate housing). I was not given any information about the classes I was teaching other than being given the materials for the class (and the information I received during training). I only had a chance to observe kindy (no TreeHouse or Step Ahead) and I was not given the follow-up observations that are supposedly required after 3, 6, and 9 months. Despite multiple requests, the NSTs were unable to receive "fun time" craft materials for Kindy or even printer paper to use for printing tests and worksheets so we basically had to buy our own supplies out of pocket. Additionally, sometimes when Teacher's Guides/flashcard sets became outdated or went missing, the branch refused to order new ones and we were left without materials for our classes. Class performances were a HUGE ordeal, and despite being given very minimal information about the expectations for our Kindy and TreeHouse performances, we were harshly criticized for their apparent inadequacies (extremely frustrating considering we had all put a lot of unpaid time and effort into preparing them). Lastly, if you teach kindy, you should be prepared to witness the routine physical and emotional abuse of the children by their HRTs (Taiwanese teachers). At my branch, the children were hit, pushed, yelled and screamed at (often for such small transgressions as spilling water or throwing up on the floor), and forced to hug/kiss teachers and classmates against their will. If these things make you uncomfortable, being in such a classroom can make for a very unhappy situation. The branch managers seemed to condone this behavior.

I do know some people who had good experiences at their Hess branches, but overall, there are so many horror stories that you are taking a big risk by accepting a job offer from them. I think that if the organization could keep better tabs on its individual branches to make sure they are keeping their promises to their teachers, and if the organization invested a bit more in its teachers rather than treating them as disposable, then Hess could take a step toward being a more reputable business.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

We are very sorry to hear you did not get the normal support we offer our new teachers.

We do send out surveys to all our new teachers after they arrive to allow them to give us feedback and if needed, make sure their individual school is doing what is required. Also, our Head Office is always a phone call or an email away if any staff feels they should be getting better support.

We care lots about giving the support we offer, so thank you for letting us know. We would love to get more information about your specific case, so we can understand where things did not happen and make sure it does not happen again.

Default avatar
Kimberly
Female
42 years old
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
University of Manitoba

A great place to learn how to teach

8/10

Each week day was started by teaching children between the ages of 3-6. They love you so much and bring a lot of energy to the class. These classes bring a lot of satisfaction because they enter the school with zero English so everything that they learn, comes from you. It's also really fun working with young people. Watching them grow and develop personalities is interesting because each one is completely different from the other. There is also a portion of the lesson devoted to building up skills like cutting, coloring, movement, etc each lesson which allows you to help the students learn how to learn independence which brings them confidence they need to try new things.

In the evenings, you get to teach the older students. They are usually in grade 1 or higher. These students usually have some English brackground already and you are maintaining what they previously learned and expanding more on the English language. These students have the ability to share what happened in their days with you. You teach them writing, listening, speaking and reading skills to allow them to have a well rounded English language ability.

How can this program be improved?

If I had to change one thing, I would change the amount of games that we are told to use while teaching. Games are important and allow the students to have fun and enjoy class, but teaching the material from the lesson is more important...once they understand and know what they are meant to from the lesson, then a game can be used to review it or give them the opportunity to practice what they have learned.

Default avatar
Hess
Female
32 years old
Taipei
McGill University

A painful lesson

1/10

From my experience with working for Hess I can safely say Hess is not interested in students education, teachers well being, or maintaining an enriching program. Basically they cram as many students in the classes as they can to make a ton of money. The head Chinese teachers constantly undermine the foreign teachers authority - which makes it impossible to keep your class under control or teach them anything. The lesson plans are fairly well structured, but good luck finding them and finding the appropriate books. If you can think on your feet, you don't mind being disrespected, you can stand being overworked, and you can tolerate a lot of yelling - you will be able to handle hess. Overall Hess is an incredibly unprofessional and I would not recommend anyone to work for Hess.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your review of HESS International Educational Group. We're sorry to hear that you've had a negative experience, but this is certainly not the norm at our schools.

It is always difficult to keep a large number of people in a large number of locations on the same page, but we try our best to do this by having standard policies and procedures for our schools.

Training is provided to both local and foreign teachers not just for teaching, but also for cultural communication so our staff is prepared for the difficulties that come with a multicultural working environment.

We also have various resources in place in addition to the teaching material itself: head teachers, co-teachers, branch managers, and area managers are available for teachers to seek help or advice from.

We take teaching very seriously and have developed a number of structured curricula over the years that have been tried and tested to give students a well-rounded and fun immersion into the English language. These materials are designed to be very structured yet flexible so that both new and experienced teachers can use them to the students' benefit. Teachers guides with detailed lesson plans are provided, as well as class books and any other resources that teachers might need or want to use in class.

Class sizes are about 18-20 students on average, which is large enough for students to have fun practice speaking English with peers but small enough that a teacher is still able to build personal relationships with the students.

We hope that by taking these measures and others, we can help foster a positive environment at our schools and set our students and teachers up for success.

However, we know that inconsistencies are difficult to eliminate altogether, and we encourage anyone who has further questions or concerns to contact the English Human Resources Department directly at [email protected].

Default avatar
Robert
Male
32 years old
Taipei, Taiwan
University of South Florida

Good for some, real bad for others

7/10

Like most HESS teachers, this was my first teaching in Taiwan. Many people who have been living here for a while will describe HESS as a "training school." It's a mostly good introduction to being an educator as it does provide a 10 day training course, which can be useful if you are genuine about wanting to learn. Depending on the branch, they are usually pretty good about letting you observe more experienced teachers, both Taiwanese and foreigners. Just make sure that you are compensated for these observations. It's typically half your hourly pay, UNLESS you are not getting the hours promised to you in your contract. For instance, if you sign a 25-hour contract but wind up teaching 22 hours, this means you should be getting 3 hours of paid observation.

One huge benefit of HESS is the teaching materials provided. Being as large as they are, they have the resources to print books, flashcards, workbooks, and even have unique songs to go along with the curriculum.

However, your experience is largely dependent on which branch you are placed. Many have wonderful facilities, friendly staff, brilliant students, and dedicated teachers. But... there are the horror stories. Branches situated in old buildings, with a jaded Taiwanese staff who have learned to mostly ignore what they consider petulant foreign brats. Many foreign teachers at HESS are real scum bags and lend to the reputation that foreigners in Taiwan have.

But be aware that since most teachers are fresh-off-the-boat and typically only plan to stay one year, HESS teachers will not enjoy the benefits that other schools provide. For instance, absolutely no paid vacation and absolutely no holiday bonuses.

Overall, it was a pleasant experience. If you are able to see past the BS and facade, dedicate yourself to being a good teacher, and be open to the fact that things are different from back home, you should be fine. Although I had a terrible experience that caused me to leave, I would still recommend this school to unexperienced teachers.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your feedback. We at Hess do our best to take feedback and improve on things.

Your attitude towards the job is one that often separates those who are successful from those who do not have positive experiences.

We do not hide the fact that we take the responsibilities of teaching seriously and are a real job. Staff that are trying and putting in the effort that being a teacher requires will find the support we can offer to be great. People that are looking for a free ride and not interested in treating it as a job, will find the experience less than ideal.

We am sorry to hear you had a reason that cause you to leave, we do wish you had brought up your concerns with your branch/ area or contacted the Human Resources Department, as we would have done what we could to make sure both you and the school were treated fairly.

Default avatar
Hess
Female
32 years old
Taiwan
Other

Fantastic support at Hess. Not as bad as the rumors. Worth a try if you're willing to actually work.

8/10

As a current Hess teacher, I can say that my experience has not been nearly as bad or ugly as some of the previous reviews claim. In fact, it's been just the opposite.

Personally, I have had a great experience with Hess and in Taiwan, and I plan to continue working here. This school (company) has given me many opportunities that I couldn't have found elsewhere in Taiwan. As a big company with foreigners in higher-up places, it also gives its teachers more potential to move up or participate in activities that smaller schools don't do.

Of course, no school is perfect, so this is not to say it is negative-free. Yes, Hess requires a lot of its teachers. You will work hard. It won't be a vacation in Asia where you can just stand in class looking foreign without any more effort exerted. If that's what you're looking for, Hess is probably not the best place to start for you. There are hiccups now and then, but if you're willing to utilize the resources available, it's nothing that can't be sorted out.

Speaking of resources, the support at Hess is second to none. They are fine for more experienced teachers, but especially for first-time teachers, you'll be well taken care of and guided the whole time. This is what lead me to Hess to begin with, and I have not been disappointed. I've been lucky to avoid all the horror stories of not being paid or schools shuttering up in the middle of the night.

Bottom line is this: A lot of people who have bad things to say about Hess came into it for the wrong reasons or with inaccurate expectations. For a lot of these people, Taiwan or teaching isn't for them and it has nothing to do with Hess because they'd have the same complaints about any school.

Realizing that things work differently in foreign countries and realizing that you actually have to WORK will take care of most issues. Anything beyond that, don't just stew about it or bail out before giving it a chance. Talk to someone, and usually the issue can be solved with some patience and teamwork.

How can this program be improved?

Like I said, I haven't had any major issues. Like any big company, communication could be better now and then, but that's where you have to ask questions for yourself. There are sometimes unexpected changes, but I don't know of any school where there aren't.

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Casey
Male
32 years old
n/a
California

HESS is cruel to foreign teachers

1/10

HESS was simply the worst employment experience I've ever had in my life. This company charges the highest tuition and promises the moon to parents, then turns around and DUMPS ALL THE RESPONSIBILITIES ON BRAND NEW TEACHERS.

Think of all the possibilities for disaster for a minute... Think of all that could go wrong.

Then realize it all HAS happened before and continues to this day. And management cares nothing about foreign teachers and always sides with the Taiwanese. Who, by the way, are quick to abuse employees.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your review of HESS.

Our ultimate goal to is provide the best educational experience for our students. This means that our staff members--both foreign and Taiwanese--work hard and put in their time and effort for the benefit of the students.

HESS has clear policies in place as well as an entire department dedicated to making sure that foreign teachers are treated fairly and supported adequately. Compared with other similar schools, HESS is one of the more upfront companies regarding these things. As we have learned from many years in business, happy teachers means happy students, so it is not in anyone's best interest to mistreat or take advantage of the resources that make our educational offerings above the standard.

We are the largest language school in Taiwan and one of the largest single employers of foreigner workers in Taiwan. We have been in business for almost 30 years, and in this time, we have employed thousands of native-speaking teachers at our schools across the country.

Like any organization of our size, there are always some people who are not happy with what we have to offer. These people have a loud voice, but thankfully, they are a small minority, and their views do not reflect those of the thousands of other teachers who have worked for us in the past and those who are still working for us.

If you have any specific questions about HESS, we would be happy to answer them for you. Contact the English Human Resources Department at [email protected].

Default avatar
OverAndOut
Male
32 years old
Taiwan

A good place to start

6/10

Hess is usually a good place to start. My experience was that they offered training and managed the paperwork and pay well.

The downside is that they try micromanage teachers' lives. They take advantage of the fact that most of their teachers have never taught before and are isolated in a foreign country whose laws they're ignorant of. They do this by imposing their rigid curriculum and desired stereotype, and pressuring those who don't fit. Not to mention the hours of unpaid labour they expect and illegal practices they carry out without the teachers' realising (for example grading homework, completing reports, training and demos, clocking in early, and fining those who leave before completed contracts). They do this because, as other reviews have mentioned, what matters is the bottom line (rather than the quality of teaching) and they know the Hess machine will ship in another teacher who's none the wiser.

If you can stomach all of this, however, it's an ok place to start. You've got a year of definite work and training that'll help you find the better schools that are out there. Just ignore the re-signing bonus they try tempt you back with and enjoy the gratitude that Hess has left you with when faced with a half-decent school.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your review of HESS.

We take teaching very seriously and have developed a number of structured curricula over the years that have been tried and tested to give students a well-rounded and fun immersion into the English language.

Our structured programs and teaching methods are not intended to punish teachers, but rather to help give students a consistent learning environment to help them thrive in the classroom.

HESS is a very large organization that is committed to educating students in English as well as Western culture. We take education very seriously, and expect our teachers to do so as well. Our standards and expectations of teachers are clearly outlined from the start on our website, application process, interview, and training. We do our best to make applicants and new teachers aware of these things because we want to ensure that they are not surprised or disappointed by our work expectations.

If you have any further questions about HESS, we'd be happy to answer them. You can reach the English Human Resources Department at [email protected].

Default avatar
Jack
Male
32 years old
Gold Coast, Australia
University of Queensland

Teaching English in Taiwan-Hess Review

1/10

Accepting an offer of employment from Hess Language School

Accepting an offer of employment from Hess Language School to teach English in Taiwan; the offer of employment from Hess can make you feel rather secure about putting up all that money and travelling to Taiwan for Hess’s training programme, but it is very important to bear in mind that candidates only have a prospect of gaining employment with Hess at the end of training.

The offer of employment is dependant on successfully passing training. Hess training is more akin to a selection process, or a nine day job interview, coupled with assessments and testing throughout. To actually be employed by Hess, as an English language teacher in Taiwan, a candidate must successfully pass this.

Training is, in my view, conducted very rapidly, one could speculate, to minimise cost. A major problem for trainees is that assessed practical demonstrations are given with only very limited and arguably inadequate amounts of time for adequate preparation. Demonstrations must be carried out in accordance with the Hess curriculum and Hess teaching style, which the trainers go through rapidly. There are also daily tests and a final exam at the end of training to contend with.

If you are not adept at public speaking you will most likely struggle with training, as you will be required to use Hess teaching methods to teach from the Hess curriculum, in front of assessors and your classmates, throughout training.

I am aware of a trainee who was told by Hess’s Head Trainer that his demonstrations were average, after only his third ever attempt at one in his life, and that as a consequence he would not be offered a contract with Hess; this was despite Hess being fully aware that he had never before taught English when they made him the offer of employment in the first place. In this persons case he had travelled from the other side of the world to take up Hess’s offer of employment. If your scores are, likewise, rather average you can expect to be similarly removed from training, and refused a position with Hess.

If you wish to teach English in Taiwan, and you are looking for employment before you get there, I recommend finding another alternative. I would additionally recommend that if you do decide to go, be prepared to find work once you get there. Also, check out this website it may help: tealit (dot) com.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

All teachers who are new to HESS must attend all required training as part of their one-year contract. This includes a 9-day initial training and four 1-day follow-up trainings.

These trainings cover basic TEFL material as well as HESS-specific curricula and teaching methods. Topics such as time management and classroom management (among others) will also be covered. Upon successful completion of these trainings and a one-year teaching contract, teachers will also be issued a HESS TEFL Certificate.

People do not often get cut from training. We understand that people make an investment when moving to a new country for work and often work hard to learn our material and develop into a good teacher. In fact, everyone in the English Human Resources Department and Training & Development Center have done these exact things.

It is not in our interests to hire people and then cut them as it wastes our time, causes us a financial loss, and can greatly inconvenience our schools and existing teachers if we do not send someone from training to the branch. Most importantly, it puts our students at a disadvantage if teachers do not arrive at the branches when they are expected.

At the same, there are occasionally some people who do not take the position seriously and show up late to training, have a negative attitude, or clearly make no effort to learn the material or prepare for their teaching demos during training. If we feel that someone sees teaching in Taiwan as a paid vacation and is clearly not interested nor making any effort to be serious about educating young children, then we reserve the right to rescind the offer and not place that person in a classroom.

As mentioned though, people do not often get cut from training because most people only accept the offer if they are genuinely interested in teaching in Taiwan. We provide a lot of support for our first-year teachers, including the initial training and four follow-up trainings throughout the year because we want to see our teachers develop and succeed.

If you have any further questions about HESS, we'd be happy to answer them. You can contact EHRD at [email protected].

Default avatar
NotHess
Male
32 years old
Taiwan
Other

Don't risk it

1/10

While it's true that the quality of Hess varies from branch to branch, you really have no way of knowing what you are getting until you are locked into a contract. The owner of Hess is in it for the money. Period. The managers are kept not based on how they treat their teachers, but on how the numbers look. They promise so much, but in my case NONE of it was delivered. They messed up my visa paperwork, my health insurance card, and they made mistakes in my pay EVERY month...it just happened that the mistakes worked out in their favor. Hess has systemic problems that start from the top; while there are so great people who work there, it's really hit and miss-and all of the craziest people I met in my years in Taiwan were at Hess! I wouldn't recommend this school to anyone-the horror stories far outweigh the good experiences once you are here and talk to a variety of people who have worked there. My advice is look elsewhere, anywhere else....

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your review of HESS.

I'm sorry to hear of the difficulties you've encountered, but these are certainly not the norm at HESS. While we are not a perfect company, when these kinds of issues arise, we do our best to fix the problem and prevent it from happening in the future.

Our top priority at any HESS branch is providing students with high-quality English education and experience. We constantly endeavor to improve and continue raising the bar on these things.

Over 30 years in business, we have had thousands of foreign teachers in our branches, and our documents staff are adept at handling all required paperwork and documents professionally an efficiently. We consider the support we offer to teachers as well as documents handling, accurate and timely payment, etc. among the basic benefits awarded to our teachers.

If we were not professional and dedicated to excellence in these areas, we would not be able to afford our students the kind of time-tested education that we do today.

We would be happy to answer any further questions you have about HESS. You can contact the English Human Resources Department at [email protected].

Default avatar
Emily
Female
24 years old
New Zealand
University of Canterbury

Hess Language School, Taichung, Taiwan

8/10

This is a great place to start for first-time teachers. The lesson plans are given to you, you have a 10 initial training, followed by a few days observing other teachers, and they organise all the paper work and visas for you. Some people have a great time, some have a miserable time, it's very much dependent on individual attitude and also the branch you are assigned to. It's definitely worth a shot!

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your review of HESS.

We strive to continue offering quality education to our students and support to our foreign and local teachers.

Default avatar
Tim
Male
24 years old
Taichung, Taiwan
University of Canterbury

HESS Taichung

8/10

HESS is good if you are a first-time teacher, or if you want to get a job before you travel overseas. They give you brief training and help you find a house and get set up. Your experience mostly depends on the individual branch you work at - mine was well-organised with friendly staff who were very helpful, and the other foreign teachers were great. The pay is pretty standard for new teachers - if you are qualified, you could get much better pay. The materials and lesson plans are all prepared for you. HESS has kindy classes too which is great for energetic people.

Response from HESS International Educational Group

Thank you for your review of HESS.

We pride ourselves on hiring and training quality teachers so our students receive only the best English education.

We are especially prepared to support first-time teachers but also provide the opportunity for more experienced teachers to grow and develop their skills in the classroom.

Hess is currently offering adjusted starting pay rates based on experience or having a TEFL certificate or teaching credentials.

About The Provider

BE MORE THAN A TEACHER. BE AN INSPIRATION!
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ABOUT US:
Founded in 1983, HESS International Educational Group is the largest and most recognized private language school in Taiwan.

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