Location
  • Costa Rica
Length
4 to 24 weeks

Program Details

Language
English
Age Min.
18
Age Max
99
Timeframe
Short Term Spring Break Summer Winter Year Round
Housing
Apartment Host Family Hostel
Groups
Small Group (1-15)
Travel Type
Budget Family Older Travelers Solo Women

Pricing

Starting Price
1530
Price Details
Every Program can be extended at different extension rates.

Prices may vary slightly due to exchange rate fluctuations!
What's Included
Accommodation Some Activities Airport Transfers Equipment Some Meals Wifi
What's Not Included
Airfare Travel Insurance Visa
Dec 07, 2022
May 12, 2022
12 travelers are looking at this program

About Program

Become a volunteer with Rainbow Garden Village and help in one of our programs in Costa Rica. Whether you prefer to work with children or animals, in Costa Rica we offer projects in both areas, social and wildlife conservation.

Volunteering with RGV not only gives you the opportunity to get involved in a meaningful project, but also allows you to experience the beautiful landscapes, happy people, amazing beaches and the interesting historical background of the country.
Take the chance to explore a different country in your free time and make a little big change!

Video and Photos

Program Highlights

  • Orientation Program before the start of the project
  • Spanish language course can be added (additional costs)
  • Accommodation included
  • Small Groups with up to 12 Volunteers

Popular Programs

Social Work with Children in San José, Costa Rica

In the Daycare center in Costa Ricas capital San José, children are offered everything they need to live, as well as the opportunity to learn and play. As a volunteer you can teach children between 3 Months and 12 years or help childcare. You will work in a fixed age group.

Look after children and teenagers in San José, Costa Rica

Support the local team in this project by taking care of children aged 3 to 15, helping them with their homework and working to improve their school performance. The organization lacks trained staff, which is why they are urgently looking for volunteers!

Nature Reserve with Turtles & Crocodiles

The southern Pacific coast of Costa Rica is a largely untouched treasure. Wetlands that stretch deep into the land alternate with miles of palm-fringed beaches. A research and observation station takes care of the wildlife there, which includes turtles, crocodiles, birds, mammals and butterflies.

Animal Sanctuary for Sloths, Monkeys, Birds & Turtles

Work in a sanctuary on Costa Rica's Caribbean coast, which cares for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife, such as sloths, turtles, monkeys and other animals. The sanctuary takes care of them and eventually releases them back into the wild. Assist the facility with feedings, enclosure maintenance and reintroductions and learn about Costa Rica's magnificent wildlife!

Program Reviews

5.00 Rating
based on 1 review
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  • Impact 5
  • Support 4
  • Fun 5
  • Value 4
  • Safety 5
Showing 1 - 1 of 1 reviews
Default avatar
Angelina
5/5
Yes, I recommend this program

My volunteer stay in Costa Rica

I was in two projects in Costa Rica. On the one hand I worked in the Jaguar Rescue Center, on the other hand in Reserva Playa Tortuga.
The two projects were very different. The first two months I was in the Jaguar Rescue Center.
My duties consisted of cleaning the cages of the sloths and birds, bringing food to the animals, also taking care of the rats and mice (on a volunteer basis), raking, sweeping, doing laundry, watching the birds, watching the baby sloths, and my personal highlight: playing with the baby monkeys.
The longer you are there, the more responsibility you get and your wishes are taken care of. You get to make things happen. You can turn cages into a jungle with banana leaves and hibiscus, feed baby monkeys with bananas, and catch all kinds of animals trying to escape (get creative).

Reserva Playa Tortuga, on the other hand, was a reserve. There were no cages and one did not have so much direct contact with the animals. The animals were observed and everything was recorded in writings. People would often go on hikes and count the different species of birds or walk along the beach looking for parrots. The reserve also had a butterfly garden and sometimes they went to the jungle looking for bats.
There are boat tours to look for crocodiles and night tours to catch caimans and snakes to measure and weigh them.
The main activity is working with the turtles, if it is turtle season. At night, the beach is patrolled to locate egg-laying sea turtles. The eggs are then buried in a large nest which must be checked several times a day so that the baby turtles can be released into the sea after having hatched.

At the beginning of both projects I was alone with another volunteer and towards the end we were a group of 15 people of all ages and different backgrounds. Working together was a lot of fun and you can easily improve your Spanish, French and English speaking skills. And even if there are difficulties with communication, you always understand each other and have fun together. Both times I stayed in a hostel. This is the best thing you can do because you are on site. You are constantly surrounded by animals and you can have a much closer connection with the team and the other workers and volunteers, even in your free time.

My assignment was very useful. Since I was in both projects for about two months, I had a lot of responsibility and did work alone, taking care of the animals and getting to know new volunteers. I dedicated these 4 months to the animals and tried to help them as much as possible.
But the special moments are with the animals, when you manage to make them happy and see how they react to your work - the bird that is suddenly lively again because you have turned its cage into a land of milk and honey, the sloth that is happy about the hibiscus flower, the baby turtles that swim towards the sunrise or the baby monkeys that immediately jump on you when you come into their cage. Then they won't let you go. You can't leave the cage until they fall asleep.
Elena S.

17 people found this review helpful.

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