SIT Study Abroad Mexico: Migration, Borders, and Transnational Communities

Video and Photos

guys playing soccer on the beach
guys playing soccer on the beach

About

Discover the contemporary realities of international undocumented migration and border enforcement and their immense human impact and political and social tension in the context of Mexico, Central America, and the United States.

Start out in Tucson, a major point of entry for undocumented migrants entering the US.

In this area of contrasts, see how citizens are organizing immigrants’ rights groups even as the US government is building up its border enforcement. You’ll learn what undocumented migrants go through on their journey to the US border and what they face once on US soil. What you learn here will provide much of the context for the rest of the semester.

Highlights
  • Live in a Mexican state that is the point of origin for many of the migrants going to the US.
  • Understand the factors that lead to undocumented migration.
  • Get a firsthand look at two different borders.
  • See how migration affects Central Americans during a two-day stay in Guatemala.

Questions & Answers

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LANEY
10/10
Yes, I recommend this program

Amazing!

If you enjoy hands-on learning, SIT Mexico is an excellent program for you. Each class/unit has an on-site experience that will enforce all that you learned and more in the classroom. Each individual that accompanies you on the trips has a vast amount of knowledge that they are passionate about sharing with students. You will be introduced to individuals residing in each place that are working to assist their community. Finally, in your final month, you will have the incredible opportunity to complete an independent study on any topic that you find interesting. During the process, you have loads of support from academic directors and program coordinators. You can also reach out to those that you've met during your excursions and collaborate. It allows you to completely dive into your interests and learn in a project-based manner. Generally, administrators are always present to help. You develop a sense of community with everyone working in the Ollin educational center, and they're always willing to help. Sometimes, there is so much going on that things slip to the bottom and more minor questions don't get answered right away. But, schedule a face-to-face meeting and you'll get all of your questions answered and more. I loved my homestay, and it was probably the best part of my abroad experience. The homestay's were expertly matched, and care was taken to ensure that each student's needs could be met by the family they were matched with. I still stay in touch with my family, and they had been hosting students for almost 20 years. If one does have problems, though, there are plenty of opportunities to speak to administrators about the problem and find a solution. Again, dietary restrictions were taken into consideration for each student and they were matched with their family appropriately. The food in Oaxaca is world renowned and excellent, but there are all kinds of restaurant's that serve everything from hamburgers to hummus. My family was great about making food that I liked, though I'm not exactly a picky eater. There are all kinds of opportunities to participate in local events and groups. You really feel as though you're living in the city of Oaxaca by the end. However, the group is only American students, meaning that you have to branch out on your own in order to make connections with local Oaxacans outside of your host family.
Oaxaca is incredibly safe, and if one simply follows protocol that they would fall in any larger city, they'll be more than safe!

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
Attempt to make more connections in the community and branch out!