Become a Global Health Volunteer in Nicaragua!
93% Rating
(11 Reviews)

Become a Global Health Volunteer in Nicaragua!

FIMRC's Project Limón, located on the Pacific coast approximately 120km from the capital of Managua, brings medical care to rural areas of Nicaragua. FIMRC's clinic serves as home base where specialty services are provided to women and children.

Volunteers maintain important roles in the clinic through assisting with charting patients' vitals, inputting data into our electronic medical record systems, building health based curricula on topics such as proper dental care, and observing clinical interactions with medical staff. Outside FIMRC's clinic, volunteers assist with outreach initiatives such as prenatal home visits, glucose testing for diabetics, and conducting assessments for the developmental program. No previous medical experience is required!

Over the course of your trip you'll receive an unfiltered experience in health care field work abroad, and learn about the tremendous impact that even one person can have!

Locations
North America » Nicaragua
Length
1-2 Weeks
2-4 Weeks
1-3 Months
3-6 Months
6-12 Months
1 Year+
Project Types
Medical
Sexual Health
Language
English
Housing
Host Family
Hotel
Starting Price
$0.00
Currency
USD
Price Details
The cost of your program includes the program donation that supports our project sites as well as housing, some meals, and transportation. Transportation includes airport pick up/drop off and transportation to volunteer activities. Airfare is not included. By arranging lodging, food, and transport for you, we enable you to safely experience the local culture and focus your energy on the work you will be doing in the community!

Questions & Answers

Program Reviews

  • Impact
    89%
  • Support
    95%
  • Fun
    83%
  • Value
    89%
  • Safety
    96%

Program Reviews (11)

Doris
Female
25 years old
Los Angeles, California

SIHF 2016

8/10

I went to Nicaragua for two months in the summer of 2016. Both of my parents were born in Central America so I was very aware of the day to day lifestyle, which I thought would come in handy since I was going to have a host family. My host family consisted of only a sweet and caring lady, who's only daughter had grown up, married and left to live her life. I was a little disappointed to find out that I wasn't going to have any host siblings. but by the end of the trip I was very grateful that I had the opportunity to bond so much with my host mom and that I actually got to experience and live the life I have heard so much about while growing up.
Working at the clinic itself was also a positive experience that both the staff and the big group of female peers contributed to. I was part of a group of about 16 females from different parts of the U.S. whom I was able to bond with on several occasions. Jessica and Zane are awesome and did an amazing job at making sure that we all had the chance to observe, go on visits and do different tasks they had. because there were many of us we didn't always have a lot of time to do the jobs that we liked to but Jessica and Zane were flexible and did the best they could. since it was the summer and we were there for a longer period of time we were able to start our own projects to help the community. I chose to work at Los Pipitos for both months and be able to help children who needed special attention with physical therapy and others with their numbers, letter, etc. I absolutely loved it! being able to go to Los Pipitos to see and help out the children was my favorite thing from the clinic. I also like observing the pediatrician and seeing how not only did she travel from another city to help, but she taught and explained to the parents why their child was sick and how to help it was different than how the doctors in the U.S. do it.
As for Nicaragua itself....it's beautiful. I enjoyed going out and visiting different parts of Nicaragua with friends during the weekends and biking it to the local beach almost everyday after work with friends. the beaches are really pretty, the sunsets are full of color but the best part is after the sunsets, and its dark, you look up to see the sky full of bright stars, something that the city lights block out at home. I would definitely do it again.

Emilie
Female
25 years old
Williamsburg, VA
Clemson University

FIMRC Nicaragua

9/10

The Foundation for the International Medical Relief of Children (FIMRC) is an INCREDIBLE organization that offers once in a lifetime experiences for those who take advantage. These trips are geared for those that are interested in public health, children, communities, and adventures. My trip to Nicaragua was a wonderful experience that I will never forget. I went with a group from Clemson (my alma mater) for a 1 week medical mission trip. The accommodations were very nice- we stayed at the Surf Sanctuary which is owned by an American family that decided to move to Nicaragua. There is a pool, an awesome cook from South Africa (I think he is still there), and it is super close to the beach. As far as location goes- this is an awesome place to be if you want a volunteer trip with some relaxation included.

For the volunteering part- we mainly worked in the FIMRC clinic and in the adjacent government clinic helping with vitals, organizing the pharmacy, painting the clinic, and interacting with children and their families. We also went on home visits with a community health worker that focused on pre-natal care and with another health worker that focused on diabetes. In addition, on the last day we worked in a physical therapy clinic with children that suffered from physical ailments. It was a very rewarding experience and I felt like we truly were making a difference. One of the best things about FIMRC is that the work they do is sustainable- they don't just send foreigners in to change things, they create jobs and opportunities for the communities to get involved which makes their work more meaningful.

I highly recommend this experience!!

How can this program be improved?

I guess more interaction with the locals- the drawback of the nice accommodations is that you don't get that full immersion experience, which has it's pros and cons.

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Swapna
Female
32 years old
Philadelphia, PA
Drexel University

Salud de Nica!

10/10

I was lucky enough to travel to Nicaragua in July 2014 to work on a Practicum project for school I had been working on for a few months prior at FIMRC HQ. I worked on implementing a program that would benefit the community in learning about the most prominent prevalent diseases in the area. I do not speak much Spanish (something I recommend), but I was able to get by.

Clinic experience:

I had no expectations going down to Nica, but working in the clinics was such a incredible experience. I got to oversee and educate young woman on being pregnant, I played with kids and took their vitals in the clinic, I educated students at the local school on certain diseases, like UTIs.

One have my favorite days in clinic was when the most of the volunteers got split up to go to an American Singing Competition at a local high school and three of us decided to go to Los Pipitos Development Program. I decided to go to the program because I wanted to get experience working with kids in physical therapy; it was such a humbling experience working with the kids.

Host Family & Weekend Experience:

My experience was absolutely wonderful. I stayed with a host family, something else I highly recommend rather than staying at the lodge, and my siblings were so kind and fun. I chose to live with a big family to replicate my own family back in the States---- it definitely made my experience much more fun! Although I was their first guest staying in the house, It did not take long for the family to warm up to me. I quickly became good friends with my siblings and cousins-- we played baseball several times a week when I got home from the clinic. I had two weekends in Nicaragua, and was fortunate enough to travel to Ometepe Island (I did a 3-4 hour hike to the top a waterfall near the top of a volcano) and Granada (I took an island tour and a evening/sunset volcano tour).

I found out that some of the locals who moved from the States did yoga at Jiquelite Beach almost every other day at 7AM--- I took advantage of participating and then went straight to clinic after!

Overall Experience:

Overall, my experience was unforgettable. I still talk to my family a few times a month and the food was amazing (I still crave for rice and beans!). One thing I realized I needed on this trip was patience. Without patience, volunteers may not get the experience they want---- you must let go of everything negative in your life and come with a smile on your face to clinic. Enjoy and immerse yourself in every way possible in the culture!

How can this program be improved?

I would recommend volunteers to know a little bit of Spanish, or give them some material to look over small phrases/words to understand beginner level.

I wasn't fluent and I took Spanish years ago, so it slowly came back to me. But I was lucky enough to have volunteers around me to help me get by--- but I wish I knew a little more!

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Jon
Male
24 years old
Clemson, SC
Clemson University

Just As Good the Second Time Around!

10/10

I loved going to Nicaragua with FIMRC. I loved it so much that I chose to return for my second year in a row. Everything about the experience is incredible. My first trip to Nicaragua was my first time ever doing anything related to medical missions, and it did not disappoint. I really enjoyed everything that we did from going into the community and educating the locals, to shadowing the pediatrician and taking the vitals of all the children in the clinic.

I chose to return to this site for a second time in order to see how things had progressed, and it was amazing to see how far things had come in just one year! In just the short time between my two trips, the average blood pressure of the people in the community dropped below 200 for the first time, which was a huge accomplishment that they had been working towards for a while. Also, they were able to add an OB/GYN part of the clinic, which is greatly needed for the community where there is so little knowledge about pregnancy and everything that goes along with it.

Overall, I would definitely recommend this trip to anyone. Everything about it is fantastic. Both groups I went with loved the FIMRC workers, the local people, the food, and everything else, and I may just have to go back for a third time next year!

How can this program be improved?

There are a few times when there is a little bit of down time during the day, and it would be good if we could find little things to do to fill that time. But other than that, this program is great!

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Katie
Female
24 years old
Richmond, Virginia
University of Alabama- Birmingham

Unforgettable Experience

10/10

This was my first medical mission trip and it truly was amazing. I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know the FIMRC staff and the community we served. Some of my favorite memories from the trip were the visits into the schools, going into the community to do diabetic and pre-natal home visits, shadowing the pediatrician who travels from Rivas, and of course all of the delicious meals!! FIMRC does a great job with carrying out their mission and it is easy to tell how much they have impacted the community through Project Limón. The staff is truly passionate for what they do and it is a really positive atmosphere to be in. Something that I thought was really neat was that in the group of 12 I was in, everyone was studying something different back at their schools- and they were not just wanting to go into health-related fields. As a nursing major, I, of course thought that everything I was able to do and see was unforgettable and I loved learning day-by-day through the people we were serving. Some of the friends I made on the trip in the group, who were studying business, education, and others, got just as much out of this experience as I had! My point is, this trip can really be for anyone!! The people in Nicaragua were by far some of the kindest and most giving people I have ever encountered. I learned a lot about global healthcare, a lot about a country I had previously never been to, and a lot about myself through this wonderful experience. My goal for my next trip with FIMRC is to learn Spanish and I already can't wait!! I would highly recommend Project Limón in Nicaragua to anyone,

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Nisha
Female
32 years old
Atlanta, Georgia
University of Georgia

Wonderful Experience!

9/10

Seeing how FIMRC has made differences in the access to care for children is so inspiring. Jessica and Delaney have done a great job involving the community, too! I especially enjoyed working with the community through the home visits. It was a great way to understand the culture and see the barriers to healthcare the community must deal with. My other favorite activity was interacting with the kids at Los Pipitos. They're so wonderful to be around, and it's a great project! Also, I absolutely loved my homestay. Getting to know the family was an experience I'll never forget.

I'm excited to see the new projects the group is working on to get underway. It was a great reminder what we can do for our world and our fellow humans.

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Meghan
Female
24 years old
Groveland, Massachusetts
Roger Williams University

Life Changing Experience

10/10

The FIMRC Nicaragua site was an incredible place. It is amazing that a place with so little can offer so much. The whole community was friendly and seemed genuinely happy to have us visit. During the diabetes program, we were able to walk into people's homes and perform blood pressure and blood sugar tests without anyone feeling uncomfortable. The community does not have much, but that doesn't affect their attitudes. Every person I interacted with made me feel like I was actually helping and was a part of the program. I have never been on a mission trip before and this one truly changed my life. I am so happy with my choice to work with FIMRC at this particular site. The staff had a lot to do with my positive experience. Jess, Delaney,Anthony, and Sheyla were awesome. They all truly cared about the community we worked in and were devoted to making it a better place. Learning from them was such a unique experience, it was really eye opening to hear from people who were living and experiencing this journey first hand. This trip has made me more aware of how lucky we are in the U.S. I would highly encourage anyone to work with this organization and travel abroad because it offers lesson that can be valuable to anyone. I can't wait to be back!

How can this program be improved?

More interaction with the community- actually talking with the people and learning about their culture. Maybe have more people like Sheyla that could act as translators and give us more insight into how the community actually works.

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Jackie
Female
19 years old
Walpole, Massachusetts
Roger Williams University

A Wonderful and Life Changing Experience

10/10

Where to even begin? The week I spent in Nicaragua with FIMRC was one of the most heartwarming and eye-opening experiences I have ever encountered. From teaching children in their schools and educating people in their own houses to helping a pediatrician and observing a clinic and hospital, I could not have asked for a more diverse and educating visit. The relationships and bonds my group and I created with the communities we visited will never be replaced. With the help of the amazing FIMRC staff, I truly felt I was making a difference, even if that difference just impacted a little girl for a few moments. I highly, highly, highly suggest anyone who is interested in helping others to visit FIMRC's Project Limon site! The visit will change the way you view the world and truly turn your perspective of poverty, health care, and love in a different direction.

How can this program be improved?

FIMRC's program in Limon is absolutely brilliant. Their services aid the communities around them more than I can even imagine. One thing I do hope to see improved is the issue of clean water. I know this is a huge task to complete, but most health issues involve the dirty water. Other than that, I left without any complaints or concerns!

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Joan
Female
24 years old
West Lafayette, IN
Purdue University

My first mission trip!

8/10

It was my first mission trip: I really loved Nicaragua and the program, but I think they should have informed us about the alternative plan. We were not informed that our visit to local schools before the trip, and they informed us that the school is on vacation once we arrived, so we had alternative schedule. We gave diabetes presentations, met local communities, visited hospitals, interacted with kids in the hot spring, went to Granada, and went to zip lining. The sanctuary is very safe and all the staff are nice. We had lot of free time in the afternoon to visit the beach right next to the sanctuary, which is beautiful! After one year, I miss the food and the people.

How can this program be improved?

The staff could have informed us about schools that are cancelled for winter break and the alternative plans.

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Christine
Female
24 years old
Austin, Texas
University of Texas- Austin

Great medical experience!

8/10

My medical trip lasted two weeks in August 2013. I was there alongside three other pre-medical students at my university.

The highlights of my trip included giving "charlas" (small chats with mothers/elementary school students) at the clinic and at different elementary schools, shadowing the local pediatrician twice a week, and experiencing how everyday life was like in rural Nicaragua. I was very surprised at the efficiency of the clinic, which is run by Jessica Southern, a registered nurse. It was very systematic, and usually, the student volunteers were given a task. I especially enjoyed shadowing the pediatrician and getting the "inside look"in the Nicaraguan lifestyle. The pediatrican was very complementary and translated the diagnosis and treatment plan to us, and it was cool to see a good range of cases. In addition, we were able to eat at many different homes and see the condition of their living situation. It was good, because we definitely were able to see the problems that were facing the specific Nicaraguan community: diabetes (due to their high sugar intake), improper hygiene (due to the lack of clean water/accessibility to clean toilets and sinks), and the presence of insects/mosquitoes (which cause dengue fever).

There were also many challenges that were unexpected. The first week of my trip was very good, as it was just the four of us. We were given more responsibilities that allowed us to see how we could impact the community. However, the second week, five other people came in - which diminished our responsibilities. It soon became monotonous and routine -- nothing was new. Our activities were reduced to playing with the children and we had less of an opportunity to shadow the pediatrician (which was the main highlight of the trip).

How can this program be improved?

If I could change one thing, it would be to create more hands-on opportunities for the student volunteers so they could see that what they do in the trip have positive effects to the community at large.

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Lorenny
Female
24 years old
Rochester, NY
Other

1 week is not enough!

10/10

Project Limon was a wonderful experience.During my visit, I enjoyed visiting the community, listening to their health concerns, and sharing my knowledge in the medical field with all the staff and other volunteers. I feel 1 week is not enough! There's a lot to learn, discover and enjoy in this amazing country especially in this community surrounded by beautiful and welcoming individuals. I cannot express in words how lucky I was to work with Jessica and Martha. I hope I can come back one day and bring more help to a community.

How can this program be improved?

They should let more people know about this project and the change they are making in the world!

About The Provider

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The Foundation for International Medical Relief of Children (FIMRC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the health of families in the developing world through innovative and self-sustainable health programs. Operating since 2002, we have grown to ten project sites in nine countries including: Costa

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