Lincoln University

Lincoln University

About

Established in 1878, Lincoln University has been a key contributor to the primary industries that sit at the core interests of the New Zealand economy. Ranked 317th in the world , and the top 50 in Agriculture and Forestry (QS Rankings), we are the only specialist land-based university in New Zealand.

Small class sizes, practical work, relevant field trips and a fun environment are a few good reasons why you should choose Lincoln University.

Themed Study Abroad programmes - sustainability - feed the world, protect the future and live well. Strong sports clubs in the sports of rugby and basketball.

Gateway to the scenic beauty of The South Island.

Reviews

Default avatar
Max
7/10
Yes, I recommend this program

In my opinion there is no most urgent topic than the actual climate crisis and all its effects on our very existance. Thats why I study Natural Ressource Management and Ecological Engeneering (NARMEE) in Austia + NZ. But somehow it´s contradictionary to have that passion and then get into a plane, which is the biggest legal crime you can make regarding the CO2 emissions from aviation. So what now?
I decided to make a slow travelling journey to come to NZ: I took trains all the way from Vienna to Bejing (transsibirian train), flew to Auckland and took trains, ferries and hitchhiked down to Lincoln. NO WORDS!

The quality of the lectures and the familiar atmosphere at Lincoln is amazing! So worth it. Everybody cares about you and the doors of the lecurers are always open. The variety of cources allow to specify in many different fields.
I had a great time at LU!

What would you improve about this program?
The woarkload is quite high. Make sure that you stay on top of things from the beginning on. I would also improove the sustanability image of the university. There is a lot to be done for example offering incentives for climate friendly travelling, carbon neutral degrees, students inclusion in LU decision making, ... . I would hope that LU is leading the way regarding climate activism. It´s the responsibility of a university to not just spread knowledge but also incorporate it and own it! LU could be a role model for society, other universities and studentds worldwide if changes to more climate leadership would be taken!
Default avatar
Kayla
10/10
Yes, I recommend this program

First off, make sure to give yourself an ample amount of time to travel to New Zealand prior to the beginning of classes. I gave myself three weeks and could have used more time honestly. If you're looking for a great touring company that will provide you with great sightseeing opportunities, adrenaline activities and tramping (hiking) stops check out Wild Kiwi.

If you want to travel solo, New Zealand is a great place to do so. Public transportation is a breeze and in my personal opinion hitchhiking is safe, preferably with a buddy. Dispersed throughout New Zealand are affordable hostels and backpackers where you meet the best of people, don't be afraid to get out of your comfort zone and engage in conversation with fellow travelers, you won't regret it.

Now for the school part, compared to my personal experience back home I would say the class sizes, academics and grading scale vary drastically. Classes at Lincoln are very small which can be good and bad, the teachers get to know you and will go out of their way to help but once they know you're international, they will pick on you (not in a bad way). I've also noticed that academically the classes are a wee bit more intense in the sense they go into greater detail. A personal struggle is that I do not come from a farming background whereas the majority of students at Lincoln do and I felt as if I was way behind in both my nutrition and dairy class going into the class. In saying this, with plenty of readings provided by the professors and speaking to the lecturers following class, I was able to catch up. The classes are extremely educational and are taught by intelligent professors (Jim-Nutrition & Pablo-Dairy). Lecturers teach so you understand the content and can use it practically following university, not just to pass the class. For my university back home (Colorado State University) my grades from Lincoln come back as either pass or fail. The grading scale at Lincoln is unlike that of CSU's. The grading scale is such as; 100-90=A+ 89-85=A 84-80=A- 79-75=B+ 74-70=B 69-65=B- 64-60=C+ 59-55=C 54-50 C- all considered passing with anything lower being a failing grade. Although this sounds extremely easy, there are on average only a total of four grades in the grade book, each assignment heavily weighted.

Tips/things you should know
- If you're flatting on campus, Farm Road flats are the way to go. They are four bedroom flats with a common living room, kitchen, bathroom and washer/dryer. They are only a 7-9 minute walk from the center of campus.
- DO NOT wait until the last week to finish large assignments
- Travel on the weekends when possible, busses are fairly priced. Cars are reasonably cheap but depending on how long you stay it may not be worth it (petrol, maintenance, WOF, Reg.)
- Get involved (Tramping and Climbing Club, weightlifting, LUSA)
- Don't be afraid to ask for help, there are plenty of resources provided by the school
- Fashion is not a big deal in New Zealand, comfort is. I only wore make-up and got dressed up a handful of times when we went into town. With saying this, the university does put on dance so make sure to bring at least one semi-formal outfit.
- Lincoln is farther from the city center than I expected (1:15 by bus and 25-30 by car). In the lincoln township, there are the necessities such as a grocery store, a few pubs, a small pharmacy, a small police station, a post office, a hardware store, 2 hairdressers and a handful of restaurants.
- Everyone goes out of Wednesday since that's when students get their money from the government. The Famous Grouse and The Yaldy are the closest pubs to Lincoln. The drinking age in New Zealand is 18 but they are very strict with this so be sure to bring your passport or get a Kiwi Access card, you can NOT use your driver's license from outside of New Zealand. When you're purchasing alcohol they check everyone's ID so make sure everyone has appropriate identification on them.

Last thing to be said, although it is a ton of fun and I would highly recommend studying abroad you do have to study in order to pass.

What was your funniest moment?
The funniest of moments during my experience would have to be all the times I said "huh" when a kiwi (New Zealander) spoke to me. The amount of phrases they have that differ from that in the states is mind blowing. The first two weeks of being in New Zealand I learned the phrase "sweet as" which is pretty simple and is similar to "cool" or "awesome" but little did I know that it is "sweet as" and not "sweet ass". My friends let me say it wrong for over two weeks until finally a kiwi in passing informed me of my mistake. This was quite embarrassing because I used that phrase non stop before being told and can't imagine the amount of people I said it to. A common thing done in New Zealand is to add "as" to the end of a word such as, ''cool as", "fun as" and "expensive as". Also people will say "yeah nah yea" which is like yes, I was told that whatever they end on is what they mean so if someone said "yeah nah" that would be nah. There are plenty of phases you will be familiarized along your travels. To name a few; cut the shape=to dance, can't be bothered or can't be f**cked= don't want to, chips=french fries, crisps=potato chips, gum boots=similar to rain boots but usually have red bands around top and bottom, stubbies= short shorts (mostly worn by guys), togs=swim suit, dusted/pissed/munted=drunk, dodgy= sketchy/unsafe, heaps= a lot, kai= Moari word for food, etc.
Default avatar
Peter
8/10
Yes, I recommend this program

My time at Lincoln University was very nice. I met many great people and learned a lot about the country and the culture. I decided to take 100 level courses to have time to travel around New Zealand. Despite the fact that there is an exchange program between my home university and Lincoln, it was not possible for me to transfer my credits and take the courses I would usually take in Germany.

Nevertheless, I have learned a lot in my courses and was able to broaden my horizons and improve my English skills. I can recommend the MAST course because it gives a very good insight into the culture of the Maori and the history of New Zealand. All in all, I do not regret the time I spent in New Zealand. I can recommend Lincoln University and I think my experience with the difficulties of transferring credits is an exception.

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
Discover New Zealand. The land is amazing and it offers so much. Experience 100% nature. Go for a swim in hot springs, walk through rainforests, experience the Maori culture and have fun.
Default avatar
Marie
7/10
Yes, I recommend this program

I have really enjoyed the months I have been in New Zealand. I'm so happy with everything I have experienced here and all the travelling I have done. It is perfect for people who love nature, outdoor activities and hiking. It is such a beautiful country with really nice, outgoing and helpful people.
Lincoln University is a small, but good university. There was a lot of organized events in the beginning, giving you the chance to meet new people and get to know Lincoln. This is something I really appreciated. The vibe here makes it easy to make new friends. I am also happy with my lecturers, which have been very helpful and understanding. There has been no problem asking questions or wanting more explanation. The support system on campus is also very good. It is easy to get help with writing and assignments etc. As an exchange student are you also included in everything on Lincoln.

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
Buy a car! It will be so much easier to travel around. Also, bring warm clothes! None of the houses on campus has insulation, it gets really cold here when it is not summer.
Default avatar
Marie
7/10
Yes, I recommend this program

I have really enjoyed the months I have been in New Zealand. I'm so happy with everything I have experienced here and all the travelling I have done. It is perfect for people who love nature, outdoor activities and hiking. It is such a beautiful country with really nice, outgoing and helpful people.
Lincoln University is a small, but good university. There was a lot of organized events in the beginning, giving you the chance to meet new people and get to know Lincoln. This is something I really appreciated. The vibe here makes it easy to make new friends. I am also happy with my lecturers, which have been very helpful and understanding. There has been no problem asking questions or wanting more explanation. The support system on campus is also very good. It is easy to get help with writing and assignments etc. As an exchange student are you also included in everything on Lincoln.

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
Buy a car! It will be so much easier to travel around. Also, bring warm clothes! None of the houses on campus has insulation, it gets really cold here when it is not summer.

Programs

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Alumni Interviews

These are in-depth Q&A sessions with verified alumni.

Lili Paradi

Lili is a Wildlife Biology & Conservation student from Canada, as well as photographer, traveler, hiker and food-and-music junkie. She enjoys puns, off-road antics and discovering hidden gems.
Lili Paradi

Why did you choose this program?

I chose this program because Lincoln University offered up an ideal best-of-both-worlds: an education where you would feel more like a part of the greater learning community, as well as a chance to do your own thing. Lincoln seemed to provide lots of time off for travel, life, and rest, as well as field trip days, getting us out into the real-world to apply our studies. They also had a really cool list of clubs to join!

What did your program provider (or university) assist you with, and what did you have to organize on your own?

Lincoln helped out with everything in settling down, from shuttles between the airport and campus to orientation week. Between my home university and Lincoln University, there was good communication for course selection, life on campus, financial advice and due dates, and getting situated in New Zealand. We had to book flights, and any other travel opportunities, as well as course selection and fee payments.

We were able to choose our own housing situation, but upon applying to live on campus, the accommodation services were always on top of any problems/queries we had. There is the option to either cook your own food in the on-campus flats or to live in a fully-catered residence. Some people even opted for both!

What is one piece of advice you'd give to someone going on your program?

Get off of campus. Lincoln is on the outskirts of the city, which makes it easy to get into Christchurch, but not anywhere else, really. To truly experience New Zealand, find a mode of transportation to get you around the two islands. Whether it is renting/buying a cheap car with friends (See: Backpacking Cars groups on Facebook!), taking the InterCity bus, or looking into travel busses such as the Kiwi Experience or Stray bus, get out and see the world!

Also, YOU have to make an attempt to make local friends. Often, people already from New Zealand do not go out of their way to make friends from people overseas, so you have to be the one to say hi!

What does an average day/week look like as a participant of this program?

I wake up fairly late in the morning - 8 or 9 o'clock usually, to enjoy my morning tea and breakfast over reading a book (such a contrast to back home, where I felt rushed to go to class each morning!). Then I head to my classes, which are usually 1-2 hours long, only about 30 people in a class. They are very interactive classes, so it is easy to stay awake and aware during the lecture! Quite often, classes end before noon, but for some people, they go until 5 pm.

After class, I go for a run outside past the University and the farms or go to the gym with my friends. I head back to the flats to hang out with my flatmates, make dinner and think about the weekend plans. Sometimes, we bake delicious baked goods together, other times we have a few laughs or go out to town (Christchurch). Some of my friends have cars, so we often go out on day trips to Akaroa, Arthur's Pass, Christchurch and beyond! I took part in a few Tramping Club trips, which also happen regularly on weekends and get you out into some rugged wilderness.

Going into your experience abroad, what was your biggest fear, and how did you overcome it? How did your views on the issue change?

My biggest fear was getting stuck at school with no friends, and spending the entire semester on just studying, staying at home and on campus. I made the effort to go out of my way to join clubs, meet people at events and sacrifice a bit of study time to socialize. The work-life balance, I found, was really easy to commit to at Lincoln and in New Zealand. For me, it is easy to get lost in getting good grades at school and not focusing on the experience at hand, but the relaxing 'she'll be alright' attitude of the University, the locals and the people around me allowed me to allow myself time to be alive and enjoy being on an exchange. I find that the University can really stress people out. It is important to maintain a balance between study and your life, even if you are searching for good grades. The memories you will have made, and the new knowledge will come from experiences, not from exams.

Before I left, my friends and family kept telling me I would 'get stuck in New Zealand'. Is this true? Is it really a place where you would never want to leave?

Well, alongside being a country completely isolated in the Southern Hemisphere with a +15 hour flight to and from any major country (other than Australia), I have found many ways that I would get stuck here and constantly thought about transferring some credits over to finish my degree here. Even though I did not end up moving here to finish school, I am already planning to come back here - maybe for a Master's perhaps? I find that the warm atmosphere, the relaxed local society and mindset, the opportunity to travel and especially the environment really made it difficult to say goodbye. Although it is a small country, it is likened to Canada and the UK in that it has a vibrant culture, a progressive growing society, a beautiful backdrop of a backyard, and you feel like you get to know everyone! I felt I had the time and opportunity to explore who I am: I had outlets for my hiking hobby, photography, and close enough to the cities to fuel my passion for music and food. Kiwis and travelers alike are kind, generous and giving. I felt at home here!

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Staff Interviews

These are in-depth Q&A sessions with program leaders.

Patrick Coleman

Job Title
Academic Coordinator, English Language

Patrick is the Academic Coordinator for English Language at Lincoln University. He has worked in a variety of sectors (high schools, tertiary institutions) and taught international students, refugees, and migrants from a diverse range of countries. He loves meeting people, regardless of where they come from, going hiking, and watching movies.

What is your favorite travel memory?

A number of years ago I had the opportunity to travel to Papua New Guinea. It has over 800 languages. I was going there on behalf of Lincoln University to do some English language testing.

To get from the capital city Port Moresby to a mining town called Kiunga I had to fly over dense tropical forests. The view from the plane was amazing. The local people were very welcoming.

My lasting impression was talking to the students after the test. Their hunger for education was something that I had not experienced before. There was a group of people who had walked for three days through dense forests to try and join our test. It was a humbling experience and made me realize how easy it is to take getting a good education for granted.

How have you changed/grown since working for your current company?

In my role as Academic Coordinator, I have been able to understand and appreciate different parts of Lincoln University.

Throughout this time, I have been in contact with lecturers and supervisors from various departments such as Agribusiness to Food Science to Landscape Architecture. The amazing people and the research that they do have broadened my own knowledge. It is because of their work and enthusiasm that I am able to bring this knowledge into our English language program.

What is the best story you've heard from a return student?

One of the major comments I get from ex-students is how thankful they are that they did our course. Some tell me how other students ask them how to write in an academic style or want help doing assignments.

I tell our students that they need to be active learners, not passive ones. By doing this they become experts at what they do.

So when I hear that ex-students are assisting others, it means I have done a great job! Some of our students have gone on to get great jobs in New Zealand and even become staff at the university.

What makes your company unique? When were you especially proud of your team?

The English language program at Lincoln is unique because it is part of the university. If you go to some institutions, English language is delivered outside the university. However, at Lincoln, English language is a division of our university. This means we are connected to the university departments. Therefore, the English Language staff work directly with other university staff to provide the best possible service when you study there.

Also, once students are enrolled they become full Lincoln University students. This means you have access to the same facilities like the library and recreation center as any other student, regardless of your length of study.

You can even join university clubs like the hiking club and get heavily discounted deals on activities around the Canterbury region.

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