Global Health Volunteer Opportunities in Peru
83% Rating
(4 Reviews)

Global Health Volunteer Opportunities in Peru

Assist in providing community and medical services to those in need while gaining global health experience and immersing yourself in a new culture!

ISL teams work in developing communities in and around Lima and Cusco after taking seminars on tropical medicine and common diseases, vital signs, physical exams, public health surveys, and medical Spanish. Peru has an employed security system named ESSALUD that only covers public and private sector employees and self-employed people who directly contribute to the economy. So, ISL serves in these communities with people who are not able to receive insurance or those who must wait long periods of time for appointments.

  • ISL has over 20 years of experience providing volunteers opportunities in 12 different countries
  • Our programs are always coordinated by our in-country employees, who are locals and know the area and culture well
  • We work under the direction of the local government Ministries of Health, and students are only involved to the extent that these officials approve
  • We treat acute conditions only and maintain contact with, and in most cases, re-visit work sites again and again to ensure a lasting relationship
Machu Picchu
Project Types
Year Round
Starting Price
Price Details
Price includes a customized itinerary and pre-travel planning, airport pick up/drop off, lodging, ground transportation, 2 meals per day, 24/7 ISL staff accompaniment, local medical professionals, learning seminars and project supplies.

Questions & Answers

Program Reviews

based on 4 reviews
  • Impact 8
  • Support 7.8
  • Fun 9
  • Value 7.8
  • Safety 9.5
Showing 1 - 4 of 4
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Lima and Pisco, Peru

The trip leaders from ISL are ANGELS in disguise. They were the highlight of this trip. There were aspects I enjoyed, and some I did not. I enjoyed our two trip leaders, our two fun days at the end where we went sand boarding/sand duning around the Ica Desert in Pisco, Peru and our trip to the National Reserve that included a beach in Pisco. I also felt very safe traveling with ISL and the other students I was with. They made sure to give us safety tips like when we could safely take our phones out for pictures, how to identify fake money, and how to watch each others backs when we went out in public. Our trip leaders had such a heart for service and I will miss them so much. If I were to do another ISL trip, it would HAVE to be with these two. We also had a third ISL representative who was from Peru. She was very knowledgeable about where we should and should not go, and obviously knew the culture well. Her attitude some days was unbearable however. She was pregnant so I kept that in mind, but at times I feel like she didn't care what experience we were getting. For example, on days where ISL paid for our lunches (which was about 3 or 4) we had to split 5 entrees for 17 people for lunch and dinner for about 3 or 4 days in a row. We went very hungry for those days. Fortunately, we brought some of our own snacks but I can't imagine the $4,000 we paid to go on this trip could not cover the cost of more meals. Another lack in this trip was communication, which was KEY for 17 people to have a successful trip. The two trip leaders communicated everything they knew to us. Our nursing "leaders" that went with us had no idea what was going on and if they did the rest of the group was so confused day after day with what we were doing because our itinerary got changed from what we were originally given. I would not like to go on another trip with this Peruvian representative from ISL. I just could not find where our $4,000 went for this trip. Our plane tickets had to be about $1,000-1,500 because we flew out Wed to Wed and we even took a red eye home, our first hotel in Lima was disgusting and could NOT have cost more than $30 USD per night for 4 nights. Our second hotel in Pisco was better, I would say 4 stars on the outside, 2 stars on the inside and in the middle of a desert so that couldn't have cost much either. We did pay for bus service the entire trip which was nice but it was often late because of A) Peru time (it's such a real thing..) and B) they weren't always told when to be there to pick us up. One last aspect I would suggest to change would be to have a more relaxed schedule. I understand they wanted us to see as much as we could in two weeks but we got up between 6 and 7 AM every single day and got home at between 9 PM and 11 PM every single day. Girls were very sick and still had to go to the days events and it was exhausting. If our schedule wasn't as packed as it was and we could spend more or less time at places we liked or didn't like it would have been more enjoyable.

How can this program be improved?

-The trip leader attitude
-Less stringent, less packed schedule and be prepared for when people get sick and need to stay in for a few hours.
-A breakdown of where all of our money was going because this was not worth $4,000.
-More doctors at our clinics or at least one American doctor.
-Everyone gets their own meal EVERY meal. No sharing. We were so hungry some days.

Response from International Service Learning

Thanks for your thoughtful comments Lydia! We take all feedback to heart, and appreciate when our volunteers take the time to communicate where we succeeded, but also how we can do things better. I'm glad to hear the experience was safe, educational and pushed your cultural boundaries a little bit! We'll look in to how we can streamline the daily activities to make sure we aren't burning our teams out with too many activities; we pride ourselves on our intensive experiences, but also have to find a good balance with downtime. I'm sorry to hear about your time with our local staff. We haven't had any issues to-date and will make sure our ISL staff training in Peru is where it needs to be. Regarding using an American doctor instead of the local one - even though it can be more difficult with the cultural differences and language, we strongly adhere to our best practice of only using local doctors to treat patients, even when it might create some initial communication challenges. We will look at providing additional local doctors for the clinic days on future teams however. Peru is one of our most expensive countries to operate in, and on each team between 70-85% of all costs go directly to in-country operations. It is also important to understand that the program fee charged by your university includes learning seminars and professional evaluations beyond your two week experience with ISL in Peru. We do not charge $4,000 for short term service learning experiences.

- Jonathan Birnbaum, ISL Executive Director

Yes, I recommend
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Peru- Machu Pichu

Overall the trip was a good experience, if we include recreational and tourist time. Strictly speaking about the missionary work, I am extremely disappointed. It was my first time traveling alone outside of the country and everything went smoothly for me, I felt safe at all times. However, there were a few things which I cannot ignore. For being a 12 day mission trip we really only had 3 days worth of clinic, or hands on time with patients. This was extremely disappointing to me as I really hoped to go to communities in need and serve them with all of my knowledge and donations we were able to. More over, OUR GROUP LEADER WAS RELATED TO THE PEOPLE IN THE COMMUNITY IN WHICH WE SET UP OUR CLINIC, her father was our driver and he knew all of the people in the community. I asked one patient that came to our clinic what had brought her in- if she was having any pain, etc, she said no, she knew our group leaders father and he told her to come in. I felt lied to, like this was all a show, a set up for us, like none of it was real and I wasn't making a real impact in this community. I was so disappointed. At that point I realized there are some many other people in the world who have no access to care, and who could have better benefited from my time, efforts and especially money, rather than our group leader's fathers family putting on some sort of show for us. Granted it wasn't all of his family members coming into the clinic, but how suspicious, how can something like this be allowed? Also, the next few days we were scheduled to go to a local hospital is Maras. When we got there the doctor explained to our group leader it was the beginning of the month and they don't see patients, they only do paper work. The day before I saw our group leader make a phone call to this doctor to give him the heads up we were coming to the hospital, so there was no planning done in advanced. So after we got to the hospital with nothing to do, we ended up folding gauze for the nurses for the next few hours. At one point I thought to myself, did I really just travel all the way to Peru to fold gauze? What good is this possibly doing? So the next day they (our group leader translated from the doctor) promised we would be able to see patients, make house calls with the doctor, do injections, etc. Turns out September 2nd is "nurses day" in Peru, so there were no patients again. I really feel like this should have been planned out ahead of time. This could have been avoided, it was two whole days wasted, traveling two hours to this hospital and back, when we could have been doing more good in the community we set the clinic up in. Perhaps if our group leader called further ahead than one day we could have swapped the hospital and community clinic days and avoided this all together. Overall 12 days was WAY too long, being that we only saw patients three days. Something else that happened was, our Peru country organizer did not tell us there was limits on the luggage when traveling from Lima to Cusco. We had to transport our personal items as well as the donations we brought and the donations ISL made us transport. My fellow team members and I ended up having an extra bag due to donations and we had to pay this out of pocket. This too could have been avoided with communication. No where in the itinerary did it state needing to take Peruvian airlines or their luggage restrictions of one bag, especially if someone was coming from a flight where they could have two bags. I really wish I could have had a more profound affect on the surrounding communities, but I am leaving that to no fault of my own. I am grateful that I was exposed to the conditions and the healthcare system of Peru, it ignited my desire to become the best healthcare provider possible so that one day I can return to communities like the ones I saw in Peru and better treat them without the constraints and strings of ISL.

How can this program be improved?

More patient care time. Better planning. Better communication.

Response from International Service Learning

Hi Haylie, Thanks for sharing your feedback with us. We are very glad that you enjoyed the Peru experience overall, and share your concerns for the number of days you were able to have for clinic. We rely on our local staff to pave the way for our teams to serve, and oftentimes they start with communities they have close ties with and work out from there. Rest assured that your work was vital to ISL's sustainable presence in Peru, and was greatly appreciated by the government and community. Oftentimes, communication overseas does not go as smoothly as we are used to or would like, and we have to adapt the best we can. We constantly strive for the best quality programming, and will look at ways to ensure that future teams get as much clinic and hospital time possible. Thanks for taking the time to leave us feedback Haylie, we take it to heart!

- Jonathan Birnbaum, ISL Executive Director

No, I don't recommend
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Beautiful Country, Beautiful Experience

The Amazon territory of Peru is a place you should visit! This place is beautiful, has great food, amazing wildlife to see, and the people in the communities we visited were so welcoming. The doctors we worked with were so willing to help us learn and gain experience in a clinic setting. I would highly recommend this program for someone who wants to learn about and experience Peru, who wants to immerse yourself in the Spanish language, and who wants to gain excellent medical experience.

Yes, I recommend
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Amazing trip, met some lifelong friends. I loved going into the communities and getting hands on medical education experience. On off days, we had many options such as playing with monkeys in the jungle or eating on a floating restaurant on the Amazon River. All in all, such a great value and I would love to go back. I never felt unsafe or unsure of my surroundings, our tour guide felt like a sister by the end of the trip. She was so knowledgeable and even hung out with us during the night.

How can this program be improved?

Expand it to more communities in the jungle :)

Yes, I recommend

About International Service Learning

International Service Learning (ISL) is a volunteer organization offering global health, education, and community enrichment opportunities in twelve different countries. Our mission is to support cultural awareness, service-based learning, and...