Honduras, a Central American country situated between Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador, is a biodiversity hotspot with mountains, jungles, and beaches. Honduras is known for its rich natural resources, including coffee, tropical fruit, and sugar cane, as well as for its growing textiles industry.

Because of a largely agricultural economy, the country is vulnerable to natural disasters; namely Hurricane Mitch, which hit Honduras in 1988. Since then, the country has recovered gradually.

Volunteer work in Honduras largely focuses on community development and education. Volunteers can make a real impact helping locals lift themselves out of poverty, and supporting sustainable growth across the nation.

Photo Credits: nan palmero.

Community Development

Development homes for children, disabled individuals, and teen mothers are always seeking help. Volunteers can teach kids in preschool to grade 3, work with local food banks, or help rehabilitate women scarred from abuse.

Health

The level of ones health in Honduras is directly tied to income level. Malnutrition and poor sanitation contribute to widespread sickness. Volunteers can work in hospitals or clinics, gaining medical experience while making an impact.

Teaching English

Ever wonder what it’s like to live at the edges of pineapple fields and cloud forests while teaching English and Spanish literacy to children? Education (e.g. literacy rates) are strong in some areas, however the country’s population is sparsely populated. Remote communities and the children within them might not have access to proper educational resources. Volunteers provide support for academics and skill building.

Volunteering Tips

NGOs/Non-Profit/Volunteer History: NGOs are very active in Honduras. From organizations focusing on bilingualism to economic integration with neighboring countries to iguana research, you will not be hard pressed to find an NGO whose goal’s align with yours. Visit here for a complete list of NGOs in Honduras.

How Volunteering in Honduras Will Help Your Future: Volunteering in Honduras will not only expose you to a rich culture in which your Spanish will greatly improve but also to organizations with which you could continue working after graduation.

Questions to Ask: Which areas are most dangerous and should thus be avoided? What are some local customs? Will I be working with community members or other volunteers, foreign or domestic?

Health and Safety of Volunteers in Honduras

Your safety depends on how much common sense you use. Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula have experienced high crime rates. Don’t go out at night either by yourself or with a group. If you have the option of taxing a taxi or walking back from your volunteer site, it’s probably best to take the former.

Note that while Dengue fever is more prevalent in rural areas, malaria has popped up both in rural and urban environments.

Programs

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