This program is no longer offered. View more programs from A Broader View Volunteers Corp.
A Broader View: Alumni Network
96% Rating
(11 Reviews)

A Broader View: Alumni Network

This program is no longer offered. View more programs from A Broader View Volunteers Corp.

ABV is committed to placing dedicated volunteers into the neediest communities. We believe volunteering is all about learning cultural differences, interacting first hand with other communities, building trust between nations, and participating in an educational exchange.

ABV has been working towards these goals since 2007. Volunteers are able to engage in projects in 22 countries. If you don't see the country you are interested in, you can look under this listing. Or if you participated in a program that you don't see on the ABV profile page, you can leave a review under this listing.

Locations
North America
Length
1-2 Weeks
2-4 Weeks
1-3 Months
Language
English
Starting Price
$0.00
Currency
USD

Questions & Answers

Program Reviews

  • Impact
    91%
  • Support
    96%
  • Fun
    99%
  • Value
    95%
  • Safety
    95%

Program Reviews (11)

Default avatar
Sarah
Female
22 years old
middleton, WI

Tanzania

10/10

I am very glad I chose ABV for my first volunteer experience abroad. I was very well taken care of, and supported the whole time I was in Tanzania. I was also given enough freedom to shape my time there how I wanted, and left me more independent and self reliant.
It was most difficult for me to witness such intense poverty and lack of infrastructure in so many communities and schools, knowing that the government is not doing enough to help alleviate it. There is corruption and injustice in the political system that is holding the entire country back and not utilizing its resources. It's a beautiful country and the people are wonderful; it's hard to see many of them not having access or ability to enjoy the benefits.
You will probably be faced with a whole host of new situations that you've never experienced before, and may even only experience in Tanzania. This might be the first time you've been the minority, or the first time you've been the majority depending on where you're from. You will be called a "mzungu" no matter what. Your cultural norms will be challenged. You can respect traditions without agreeing with them. Nothing will go as planned. Everything will not be what you expected regardless of how many program guides you read. Just know that everything will be alright if you allow yourself to go with the flow and be flexible and accepting. Also know that there is a whole support network for you if you need it. Being self driven and willing to make your own experience are key to having a fantastic adventure.

Default avatar
JessicaJ
Female
24 years old
Lebanon
William Jewell College

Greay experience in Uganda

10/10

I am very thankful for this whole experience in Uganda as it taught me a lot about myself, and showed me how amazing people are all the way on the other side of the globe. The people I met changed my life for the better which included the natives of Uganda and the other volunteers/tourists I was able to meet. They showed me a different kind of lifestyle that works, but that can be made better as a community as a whole and that there are wonderful people out there doing just that!
I was able to meet and talk with Hydyn and deliver solar lights. Along with his story the actual giving of the solar lights was an amazing experience, the families were so appreciative. When we delivered them in the rural parts where there is no electricity, it was hard to see such living conditions as if you wanted a flashlight you had to walk 10 miles there and 10 miles back, so the people receiving the lights were very thankful and we had a great time making them smile and dancing and hugging. It was a well rounded amazing experience.
ABV USA support was great prior to traveling. ABV was right to cancel our trip to Kenya due to the safety issues at that moment in the country. After canceling the trip they were amazing in working with us on making sure we were still able to go with their program to a different country. ABV was good at answering all of our questions through email with a quick responses.

Default avatar
SamS
Male
19 years old
Philadelphia

Tanzania Orphanage Project

10/10

The experience working at the orphanage was pretty incredible. The kids there were so of the most mature kids I’ve ever worked with, they are also the sweetest kids. I think the environment for the kids is incredible kind and what their doing is absolutely amazing. Something else that really impacted me was David, he was one of the sweetest guys ever and I think what he is doing is amazing and needs to be recognized on a global scale.

If you plan on climbing Kilimanjaro make sure you do your research and then bring clothes for the trip, I know one volunteer was going to climb Kilimanjaro and it was a huge hassle for her to deal with the companies and getting equipment

Default avatar
Jocelynn
Female
32 years old
Calgary

Orphanage Support Tanzania Arusha

10/10

I hope to go back to Tanzania as soon as I can. Even though I didn’t get to spend as much time with the kids as I would have liked, I just went for 2 weeks. I still managed to create a bond with many of the children and it was really hard to leave. Arusha in general was a phenomenal place. I loved the atmosphere and felt completely comfortable the whole time (after my initial shock to the change in smells, sights, and sounds – which I realize is completely normal). I loved the mentality in Arusha, how friendly everyone was and how it seemed everyone was there to help anyone – no matter what. I think we could use a little of that mentality over here in North America where everyone is doing their own thing and in their own heads. Pencils!!! The kids really need pencils and pens! A lot of them, their parents can’t afford to buy them more so they have these tiny little bits of lead they try to write with. Also, pencil sharpeners… I think it would be great if someone brought those ones that you can nail to the wall so the whole class can use – little individual ones are easy to lose and cause ruckus in class when kids try to share them. Erasers too – a lot of the kids’ erasers were done on their pencils and they didn’t have any extras and would have to disrupt the one kid in the class who had an eraser. Maybe that paint that turns into a chalk board when you paint it? The chalkboards are so covered in chalk that they are hard to read. Also, chalk for teachers for the board would be good too – when I was there they were using big thick chalk, in all sorts of colours, and it was so had for the kids to read – even if someone can bring those chalk protectors (metal cases for using chalk?) it prevents it from breaking and getting chalk everywhere. Things here in Canada seem, to me, quite trivial now (I need to get over that so I can continue with my planned route of education.) That’s the thing too though, I appreciate education tenfold and even basic things one learns without realizing it (basic computer knowledge etc). I have learned to appreciate the small things. Whereas before I knew I ought to appreciate, and tried (and even thought I succeeded), but now I actually can, and know I am. I also appreciate time a lot more, too and I don’t sweat the small stuff as much anymore.

Default avatar
Tahlia
Female
24 years old
Charlestown
University of Delaware

Orphanage Center Tanzania Arusha

10/10

Volunteering abroad had always been a dream of mine and it felt like the perfect time to do so. I found ABV and it caught my attention and offered my ideal location, an orphanage in Tanzania. After arriving I was a little lonely and scared but the first day that I entered a classroom at the Center I knew I was in the right place. There are no words to describe how amazing the children there were, their love for each other and for life was so inspiring especially considering how much they have been through. I was able to help teachers correct work and assist in teaching the children math and English as well as play with the kids at their break times. I found my cheeks hurting everyday from smiling so much while I was at the center. The children honestly changed my life, they opened my eyes to what real happiness and appreciation is. There is no doubt in my mind I will be volunteering again in Africa very soon and hopefully pursuing a career in teaching or social work now. The Serengeti, Lake Manyara, Ongorogoro Crater, Via Via, the Masai Market, and the hot springs were all incredible and memories that I will hold forever but the volunteering alone made my trip extraordinary. The ABV staff in the USA was extremely efficient. Every email that I sent out with questions involving initially signing up to last minute tips were answered within a day. I also received reminders of what documents I was missing and many attachments on the culture and general information that I found to be very helpful.

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Chianna
Female
24 years old
Virginia
University of Virginia

Orphanage in Tanzania Arusha

10/10

What I learned through my time spent in Tanzania cannot accurately be expressed in words. It just won’t do it justice. All I can say is the children I was privileged to get to know forever changed my life. My volunteer experience taught me to be patient, selfless, and to open my mind and heart. If you’re considering volunteering, do it! I am better person today for having let the people and life of Tanzania humble me and make me grateful for my blessed life. The children were so open and receptive to me. I had thought it might take some time to gain their trust and friendship. Instead they were warm from the beginning. Finally I understood that they wanted nothing more than to have that kind of desire for closeness from me. Leave your reservations at the door and jump in! I learned there is no set way to “properly” volunteer. I just did it with my heart. I learned to be silly with the children, hold them, and love them without holding back. I made a fool out of myself and danced to make children laugh! It’s about making the most out of the brief time you have, because that time can never be replaced. I cherished every moment I got to spend with the children as learned about who they were individually. Discovering each child’s likes, dislikes, personality traits, background… etc. is what made for wonderful memories. I will never forget the closeness I felt to each child as I held them, played with them, even became a kid myself with them!

Default avatar
Amani
Female
24 years old
Tempe

Tanzania Arusha Orphanage Program

10/10

I am so thankful for finding this ABV program. Everything went according to plan and was even better than I hoped. I was able to help the children, meet wonderful new people, and learned a lot. The dance classes , i have been giving dance classes everyday and now every time I go back to my playlist and listen to the music i can’t help myself but tear and wish I was still there with the most wonderful children I have ever met. I suggest take as least clothes as possible for you and as most as possible to give away because almost everyone is in need and giving things away to random people might sounds weird but seeing the smile on each and everyone’s face when receiving something from you is in-describable. I grew to appreciate, and although I spent days with no electricity days with no hot water it was a great way for me to wake up and thank god for where I am today.

How can this program be improved?

The most difficult this ever was saying goodbye to the children it was one of the toughest things I have ever experienced , another tough thing was being asked by the children if i had parents and if they loved me because they wish to have parents and be loved by them too that’s why i tried my best to offer all the love i can and being able to speak Swahili was a great way to have a strong relationship with the children.

Default avatar
Samantha
Female
32 years old
Sault Ste. Marie, ON, CAN
Algoma University

Satisfactory Review

9/10

I quite enjoyed the experience I had in Tacloban at the Boy's Holding Centre. Day to day work involved teaching math and English and extra-curricular activities with the children. It was great and I believe I was able to provide some of what the children needed while I was there through individual or one-on-one work with the children. One of the difficult things was that there was no translator present, though when submersed in a culture you find ways to communicate verbally and non-verbally. It would however have been beneficial to have had someone present to help with the language, as it would have had more of an impact for the children. When I absolutely needed someone to translate I did ask staff. My highlights with the children were often playing basketball. They are little NBA stars.

Another highlight was the transition from not knowing the community and city I was in to being able to walk through the city confident in knowing where I was going and feeling safe while I did it.

Also if I was smart I would have packed some aloe vera gel to help with the sunburn I got (self-inflicted I might add), because you cannot find it anywhere there.

I totally experienced what it was like to be an outsider because of race, though the experience was not one of negativity. The people were always quite pleasant and often tried to speak English with me. I felt safe all the time and overall thought the whole experience has had beneficial life learning outcomes for me.

If you are thinking of going to volunteer I would say "You only live once!"

How can this program be improved?

It does not matter how much you prepare or plan for the unexpected, something is always going to attempt to put a damper on your fun. The key is just having an open mind, knowing that all the resources are at your disposal if you just attune yourself to the mind and heart. Of course no program is perfect, but life is not perfect either.

I suppose if there is one thing I would improve, not change, would be the language. I wasn't bothered about the language when I was on my own and in the community, but when working with the children I believe it would have been much more beneficial for them if someone was there translating more often than just when I asked.

Default avatar
ltuckerutk
Female
32 years old
Knoxville, TN
University of Tennessee- Knoxville

Arusha, Tanzania: A social work students' perspective

9/10

Overview:
After months of saving, planning, and dreaming, no words can describe what it was like to step off the plane and wrap my mind around having finally arrived in Tanzania. My two month stay in Arusha was an adventure, an emotional, cultural, and physical challenge, and a milestone in my development as a social worker and as a person. What brought me to Tanzania was a desire to do something adventurous with my summer that was related to social work. I also developed a small research project related to working with children with HIV/AIDS and was given a small grant from my university. This program gave me the opportunity to do funded research, travel throughout Tanzania, contribute to care of orphaned and vulnerable children, give HIV/AIDS awareness and stigma presentations at schools, and participate in case management with people throughout the community living with HIV/AIDS.

Choosing A Broader View:
I chose ABV for the helpful staff and the price. I found that many of the people staying at the volunteer house were from different programs and all paid more than the ABV volunteers and did not receive anymore services than we did.

Day-to-day:
A typical day for me was getting up around 6:30 to 7:00, grabbing breakfast (typically hot tea, bread with peanut butter or jam, and sometimes fruit) and heading to the orphanage or into town to meet for home visits. The trip to the orphanage takes awhile! It is probably 1.5 to two miles to the dala dala stop. Not many of the dala dalas run all the way to Mishono Corner so you have to listen closely for the right one and when one comes by do not be shy about getting on. It is not unusual for the dala dala (a twelve passenger van) to be packed with twenty people, a few of whom may have huge baskets full of vegetables and even some chickens. You would be surprised how you can maneuver your way in and fit in the tiniest of spaces. I once was packed in and standing in the aisle and had nowhere to hold on to. We hit a bump doing a pretty high speed and I fell across the laps of six people. The entire dala dala laughed and they kind of propped me up for the rest of the ride. It's an experience. Once you have arrived at Mishono Corner, it is about a mile walk to the orphanage. Towards the end, you walk up a steep little road lined with flowers and you have finally made it! By the time I got there the older children were at school and the younger ones were having porridge. After you have cleared away and helped with washing the dishes, they usually sing songs, do dances, and then it's your time to teach them the alphabet. I liked to teach them some English words and have them teach me some Kiswahili words. After lessons it's pretty free for you to decide what you want to do: play outside, color, do a group activity, jump rope, etc. My advice: have a plan! Without one it is chaos. The staff at St. Lucia is wonderful, but they are too busy washing clothes, tending to the crops, cooking, and cleaning to be right there with you. This means it is you against seven or more kids and you don't speak their language and they don't speak yours. The kids are great, but they're like any group of kids; they hit each other, they get jealous, they rip toys from each others' hands, and they do talk back (even in Kiswahili, you'll be able to tell when a kid is giving you a what-for). Having a plan to give them structured engagement will help you avoid a lot of conflict and frustration. Like all kids, they love to show off what they're good at. Find out what each is interested in and use this to make them feel special. Also, acknowledge and accept that you will be involved in the labor that maintains the orphanage. I washed windows, walls, dishes, picked up the yard, helped cook, washed clothes (laundry done by hand for an orphanage is not something I think I can prepare you for), and changed I don't know how many diapers. My advice is to have a good attitude, a strong work ethic, and to be flexible. I would also advise that if you have any special objectives that you want to accomplish that you communicate them clearly and frequently. Contact Winifreda, the executive director, beforehand, communicate your objective and your needs to the staff, and if you sense a miscommunication or oversight, clear it up right then and there. Do not hesitate to assert yourself courteously, but clearly. The St. Lucia staff wants you to have a great experience and they don't want there to be miscommunications anymore than you do, so don't be shy. Speak up.

I would usually leave around 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. to make the long journey back to the volunteer house. Once back on the street where the volunteer house is you can hit the internet cafe on your way back, experiment with some of the food vendors, or buy any bottled water, snacks, or Airtel time for your cell phone at one of the local stalls. Back at the house the volunteers would usually journal, plan for the next day, and chat about how our days went. We ate around 6:00 or 7:00 (usually rice, stew, chapatis), read for awhile or went down to the local pub to watch soccer/football, and then called it a night. I slept in a room with two other girls and space is tight, so you will need to be organized with your packing and be able to store most of your things under your bed. A word to the wise, use a suitcase lock. With so many people under one roof it's better to be preventative than have to worry about being confrontational later.

Travel:
I went to Zanzibar and on safari while I was there and loved it. I especially would not miss safari if you can afford it. I think it was about $800 for four days and it was worth every penny. I went with two other volunteers. The more people you can get to go with you, the cheaper it will be. The safari food was very good, and camping with the other volunteers was a lot of fun. Afterwards, you can tell people you have showered in the Serengeti and have seen elephants walk through your camp site. I am not terribly outdoorsy and even I thought it was one of the most incredible adventures of my life. Zanzibar was a nice trip. You can get a really nice hotel room and split three ways it's very cheap. We stayed in Stone Town and it was gorgeous. Tons of stuff to do depending on your interests. Prison Island was a let down (it's just a resort with giant tortoises and it takes awhile to get there in a rickety little boat), but the spice plantation was really neat, and the dolphin tour was gorgeous (also rickety, leaky boat).

Advice:
Wet wipes are your friend. Bring lots.
Find a good balance between being open-minded and being clear about your needs and expectations.
Learn as much Kiswahili as you can. It isn't a must, but the locals really appreciate the effort and it will enhance your overall experience and reduce your cultural frustrations.
Read some articles about confronting your cultural biases and do some reflecting before you go and throughout your experience. Finally, ask yourself "why not?" rather than "why?"

How can this program be improved?

I wish my program had been clearer about how long of a commute it is from the house to the orphanage. I certainly don't regret doing it, but I wish I had been better prepared for it.

Default avatar
Natalie
Female
42 years old
Toronto, Canada

An amazing experience

9/10

I would highly recommend A Boarder View for anyone looking to volunteer and abroad. During my initial research finding a reputable company seemed to be overwhelming. I finally found and decided to sign on with A Boarder View and after speaking with Sarah (who is awesome) I knew I made the right decision.

They have great selection of projects and the fees are very reasonable.

I volunteered in Tanzania at a children’s orphanage and HIV hospice for 4 weeks and before I made my trip, Sarah had great communication and answered any questions I had in a timely manner. Sarah also made sure I was well prepared before my trip with material on important information and to prepare me before and during my stay in Tanzania.

From the moment I set foot in Tanzania I was welcomed and well taken care from the A Broader View coordinator in Tanzania to my host family.

My duties at the orphanage included, playing with the children, preparing meals, general care of the children, sometimes escorting them to doctor's appointments. Volunteering with the kids was a truly an amazing experience and memories I will cherish for the rest of my life. (I miss them to this day)

When I do decide to volunteer abroad again, I would only sign on again with A Broader View.

Natalie

Default avatar
Pamela
Female
42 years old
Saudi Arabia
Old Dominion University

HIV orphanage and outreach program

9/10

I had a great time with my volunteer experience. My daily activities varied per my request and I am so glad I did. I enjoyed the children at the orphanage but felt I made a bigger impact walking to the smaller villages and visiting with people with HIV. I would meet a non-skilled local who visits 5 to 10 people a day in a given village. We would go to the villages and check on known HIV patients. I purchased multivitamins and Acetaminophen, divided them into 2 week portions and distributed them to the many patients we rounded on. In some cases we intervened on behalf of the patients and bought mattresses for a paraplegic, took a sick patient to the hospital, bought food, distributed food and medications, bought dressing supplies, coordinated care with locals and village leaders. I also took photos of the patients we saw as to assist with condition tracking. I was a role model for the non skilled worker, assisting him to learn what to look for in patients and types of questions to ask.

My experience with my host was not as great. I did not get an orientation regarding the rules of the house. I also had 3 days of cold showers before anyone told me there was a switch for the hot water heater. A family member of the host, an orphan, kept asking me for all the things I had brought for the children at my center. It put me in a difficult spot. The house we stayed in was way outside of town and I did not have much of a chance to sight see or get to know the local area. I did take a local bus but had to walk 20 to 30 minutes to get to it. I did like the people I stayed with, they were very nice and made meals that I could eat. I developed gastro-intestinal issues every time I ate the local meet, my host cooked all vegetarian meals for me.

I felt pressured into using a company for my safari and was disappointed in the experience. We saw may animals but the guides did not know facts and info about plants and animals. I found a company on my own to continue my sigh seeing after my volunteering.

How can this program be improved?

More info on arrival about local customs and where to go and what to do. Also be informed of the rules!

About The Provider

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A Broader View Volunteers is a registered 501c(3) nonprofit charity located in the USA. Our organization was founded in 2007 and is based in Pennsylvania. Our charity # is 26-0594308, you can fundraise for the cost of the trip in our website and all your

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