EHN English Teaching in Bardia National Park, Nepal
90% Rating
(2 Reviews)

EHN English Teaching in Bardia National Park, Nepal

Please note we are not sending volunteers to Bardia at the moment but concentrating our work in the Kaski district of Nepal. Please see our other teaching placements.

Barida national park is in the west of Nepal close to the Indian border set in the Terai or flat lands home of the Tharu people.

This is a new project for EHN in a more remote part of Nepal which takes about 15 hrs by local bus to reach. Therefore this placement should only be considered by someone who has volunteered in a developing country before or who has an adventurous personality.

After talking to the school principal, he told us that the students of this school are struggling with the English section of a 6 part exam. This is a very common problem in Nepal and EHN would like to help by sending English speaking people to assist in the lessons.

Locations
Asia » Nepal
Length
1-3 Months
Project Types
Language
English
Housing
Host Family
Starting Price
$0.00
Currency
USD
Price Details
In the fee everything from bus transfers to placement fee and all food and lodgings are provided. In fact we tell our volunteers only to bring spending money.

Questions & Answers

Program Reviews

  • Impact
    85%
  • Support
    100%
  • Fun
    100%
  • Value
    85%
  • Safety
    85%

Program Reviews (2)

larlieticknall
Female
24 years old
Leeds, UK
University of Leeds

Gerku Medical Centre and School

9/10

My time spent in the village of Gerku was magical. I enjoy travelling and have participated in volunteering across the world but this project was the best by far. I am a medical student, and so spent most of my time working in the hut of a medical centre, treating the locals with the medications we purchased in Kathmandu. I travelled with another medical student and a radiographer.
We stayed with a local family, just a 10-15 minute walk from the centre. We felt so welcome! Living the life of a local for just a couple of weeks really opened my eyes to the way the other side of the world lives. Collecting food for meals, milking the buffalo, helping to prepare dinner, all the household tasks we hate to do back home became so enjoyable. The family members spoke very good English, and we enjoyed teaching each other about our cultures. We all became great friends. The villagers are all very friendly, and are keen for conversation, to a point where you forget you are a visitor!
In terms of teaching, I only took a class or two, but these kids are SO keen to learn! They sit there wide-eyed, very well behaved and lap up all of your teaching. The younger children's English are limited, but the older kids can keep up a simple conversation, and all are striving to improve. The classrooms are very basic, with only English (and not accurately written mind) textbooks for aid. They are very good at learning the words, but their pronunciation is limited, which is why they desperately need English speaking volunteers to help out.
I have recommended EHN to most of my friends. It is the volunteering experience that is so rare to find nowadays. I have worked with many charities and this is the one I trust the most. We felt remarkably safe out there, and I really did have the time of my life.

How can this program be improved?

EHN are trying their hardest to improve the situations over there, but obviously a higher level of approach is needed (such as improving the teaching programs at a government level). I believe they are doing their best to combat this.

AnthonyShock
Male
24 years old
UK
Bangor University

EHN are a blessing!

9/10

I volunteered with EHN for 3 weeks in September 2012. It was my first abroad volunteering experience, so it was pretty scary and was all new to me.

First thing that attracted me to EHN was the cheap program cost. That's pretty much what you initially look for, right? EHN beat everywhere in terms of cost - they're one of the most economical, honest organisations I have ever encountered.

The projects they provide are in areas of real need in Nepal, and are well-evaluated by EHN staff to ensure they're safe, ethically sound, and so you know what to expect before you start. Some of the projects were quite difficult at times; sometimes the local project staff were hard to work with, but that's essentially real life. That was the most important thing I learnt during my experience with EHN: it was real life out there, and it's not consistently easy and joyous. Really, the same applies to all projects worldwide. If you don't feel the real hardship of the community you stay with, you haven't been given the true experience that you perhaps paid a lot of money for. EHN seemed far more committed to providing a genuine experience than any other organisations like Frontier or ProjectsAbroad, and at a much much much lower price.

I couldn't recommend EHN enough for your Nepal visit.

How can this program be improved?

The organisation is still young, so there were some minor hiccups. When I visited in September 2012, the organisation had experienced an unexpected boom in volunteers and the staff suddenly had a heavy workload to deal with.

I still check in on EHN at present and they have since recruited an extra group of people to help them cope with the demand and keep up the good things they do.

About The Provider

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EHN was first set up in 2010 as a Nepali NGO called Experience Himalayan Nepal but in 2014 we registered as Education & Health Nepal after the two fields we want to concentrate on. And since that day And since day 1 we have been

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