European Master's in Nuclear Energy

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About

Engineering. Environment. Society. Study nuclear energy in context.

The MSc EMINE programme teaches tomorrow’s nuclear engineers how to address the key technical, social and environmental challenges faced by the industry today and in the future. Going beyond the scope of a traditional nuclear education, the programme helps tomorrow’s engineers understand nuclear power in the context of a diverse energy mix.

The two-year MSc EMINE programme gives you an in-depth knowledge of the nuclear industry, and its role within the wider energy ecosystem. You receive the high-level scientific and technical education required to master the engineering complexities of nuclear power generation, as well as training in business and innovation management.

MSc EMINE is an international programme for an international industry. You will join students from all over the world for two years at two different universities and one of Europe’s leading business schools.

Highlights
  • Summer school
  • Modules at company partners
  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Two years, two universities, two Master's degrees
  • Europe's largest ecosystem for sustainable energy

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Questions & Answers

Reviews

9 Rating
based on 2 reviews
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  • Academics 9
  • Support 9
  • Fun 9
  • Housing 8.5
  • Safety 9
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Fernanda Werner
Fernanda
9/10
Yes, I recommend this program

MSc EMINE - A full international experience

The three key experiences within MSc EMINE are international, practical and entrepreneurship. Studying and living abroad in two main European universities and cities was, indeed, one of the most relevant reason why I, personally, applied for the programme. Current in my 2nd year, I can reaffirm that my goal was reached and I am everyday in contact with different cultures and like-minded people from distinct backgrounds - and the values and skills developed out of this experience cannot be teach in any classroom.

Concerning the education itself, it is extremely interesting for us, young students, to learn, understand and provide possible solutions to address modern energy challenges in real world-approach projects. Truly, my 1st year in Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, UPC, was mainly lead by assignments rather than exams which reflects a positive interested of the programme to graduate students that can actually deal with the requirements of the market. In addition, the constant presence of industry stakeholders in the classroom and the several events we participated outside the university were a plus on consolidating our knowledge towards nuclear energy.

Before InnoEnergy I was quite skeptical about the opportunities of innovation within the nuclear industry. However, although still limited when compared to the renewables generation energies, the actual nuclear industry does have engaging projects aiming to diversify the dominant Light Water Reactors (LWRs) market. And here, it is emphasized the commitment of MSc EMINE on providing an entrepreneurial training for its students. For this, the Grenoble Summer School suits perfectly by addressing energy challenges through managerial and innovation skills.

Overall, being part of the InnoEnergy community is a boost to your personal and professional life. Not only the programme itself but all the events promoted by Innoenergy and its partners must be wisely exploited as tools for the student’s formation. Thus, it is also the student responsibility to take advantage of all the opportunities offered by this involving experience.

What would you improve about this program?
As the programme has its students splitted in 2 different locations, it would be enriching to promote a meeting for them to interact right in the beginning of the 1st academic year. Indeed, it is something experienced by other InnoEnergy Master’s programmes and deeply powerful as reviewed by the students. At the end, the whole idea of establishing and promoting a community is not well developed for the MSc EMINE as the students only meet after 1st year for the Summer School. By that time it is perhaps a bit too late for the students who were the whole year apart to connect and merge naturally and thus, possibly compromising their performance when working in teams and providing interesting outputs from the proposed activities.
KTH University in Winter
Jake
9/10
Yes, I recommend this program

A great academic programme and an excellent overall experience.

Studying abroad is a great opportunity to meet people from a diverse range of countries and backgrounds, knowing you will have something in common to bring you together. In the case of InnoEnergy, this is boosted further as you will spend a lot of time with people outside of your own programme.

University lectures & projects, industry interaction - both well-established & upcoming and international field trips on the academic side have prepared me well for my upcoming career. Living & studying with people from all over the world, InnoEnergy organised events and exploring the host countries with new friends has made the social side an unforgettable experience.

On reflection, studying at two high ranking European universities has allowed me to experience so much more than I would have had I studied at home and I would absolutely recommend this programme to anyone interested in a career in the nuclear industry.

What would you improve about this program?
As a subset of 'InnoEnergy Sustainable Energy' MSc programmes, there are two location choices for each year of study. The first year options; UPC, Barcelona or KTH, Stockholm have a large innoenergy community. Given the enormous presence of nuclear power in France, it makes sense that both second year options are here; Paris-Saclay, Paris or INP, Grenoble. However, whilst these locations are home to more than one InnoEnergy programme, the InnoEnergy community focus seems reduced. Furthermore, there is a tendency to push for students to carry out their internship (the last 6 months of the programme) in France - this is not mandatory, but understandably, there is a focus towards the French nuclear industry. Finally, because there are 5 EMINE options, under 5 different departments, in Paris - there was some confusion as to whether university accommodation would be guaranteed (it is!), where it would be (in many locations around the city), and who is responsible for organising this for students (still partially a mystery...).

These difficulties were all solved in the end - I received university accommodation, secured the internship I wanted in my home nation and knew many people in the city from my first year on the programme - so none of them should put you off.