Internship in Malaysia by Asia Internship Program

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About

Malaysia is a unique and vibrant country which holds a cocktail of cultures and nationalities. Aside from its impressive capital city, the overall infrastructure of Malaysia is one of the best in Asia and is continuously developing. The country has shown tremendous growth the past decade and the future looks very bright for future businesses. The finance industry is growing rapidly in Malaysia, as well as the Hospitality and NGO sectors.

With AIP, your ideal internship in Indonesia will become possible. Our experienced internship placement team and network of partner companies are guaranteed to accommodate your specifications. Your internship in Indonesia will build a strong foundation for your future caree

Highlights
  • Customized Internship
  • Fully Furnished Accommodation
  • Visa Assistance
  • 24/7 Emergency Assistance
  • Social Activities & Trips

Questions & Answers

Reviews

7.5 Rating
based on 4 reviews
  • Growth 8
  • Support 8
  • Fun 7.5
  • Housing 6.8
  • Safety 7.8
Showing 1 - 4 of 4
Default avatar
James
9/10
Yes, I recommend this program

My Gap Year and doing a 2 month internship in Malaysia.

I wanted to do something new before starting my University studies, and the idea of traveling Asia popped up in my head. So I decided to look at flights and Motels/Hostel and then ran into a few internship sites. Doing a 2-month internship in Malaysia and being able to make new friends and understand the IT industry as this is what I wanted to study in School.

Overall the process from the interview with AIP and then the Interview with the placement company was great, sadly the only thing that was a small problem for me was the time difference from Malaysia and my friends and family back home.

If you plan to do an internship in Asia my only recommendation is to have an open mind and take the opportunities when given to you.

What is your advice to future travelers on this program?
Always remember to have fun and take opportunities when it's presented.
Default avatar
Hanna
9/10
Yes, I recommend this program

Sure, why not?

I had a few months before beginning my Masters so I thought I’d take the time to do something productive whilst taking the opportunity to do some traveling.

I did a marketing internship in a very successful startup based in the city. I expected another regular internship - doing menial admin tasks, maybe helping out with some in-house projects, and whatnot. But, the internship experience turned out to be a lot more fruitful than expected. Because the start-up trend has grown so quickly over the past few years, not just in Malaysia but also in many other countries around South East Asia and East Asia, many of these new businesses rely on each other sharing support and information to continue to grow. It’s a great community that I was incredibly lucky to take part in, especially because the company I worked for trusted me enough to let me lead my own projects and take care of my own clients. There’s a lot more trust involved when working in a start-up, and definitely more responsibility is given. So, it was definitely an eye opening experience compared to the other internships/summer jobs I’ve done back home.

Start-ups, especially in Asia, definitely have their own work culture. If you’re looking to one day start your own business, or if you’re just looking to get a better understanding of Asia’s young business culture, I would definitely recommend applying to a start-up somewhere in Asia. Thanks to AIP, I was able to get my foot in the door. I’ll definitely consider coming back to Malaysia after my Masters!

What was the most unfamiliar thing you ate?
um, I suppose chicken feet soup... not the best that's for sure.
Default avatar
Donnie
9/10
Yes, I recommend this program

Hospitality intern

My time in Malaysia was mostly good. My Dad is half Malaysian and it was a side of him I wish I could relate to more hence my deciding to go. I applied through Asia Internship Program and the rest is history.

I had an interview with AIP and it was fairly painless after that (I'd say it was about six or seven weeks later) I was set up with an intervire for a Hotel based in KL which I gladly accepted. I applied with a few months to spare before my interview was due to start which I think made the preperation more relaxed. I hate feeling rushed so I'm glad I was so overzealous.

The placement was pretty good, a little slow going for the first month as it was off season but it picked up for my last couple of weeks there. My favourite duty was talking behind the reception as I got to speak with lots of people from different backgrounds. Considering I was an intern I got a fair amout of exposure and responsibility, I can't say I love the feeling of being thrown into the deep end but I know it's the best way to learn.

Most of my time in Malaysia was amazing, the only down I has was leaving my bag unattended in a bar one night, of course it was taken and really it was more my own absentmindedness than anything else but it was still upsetting. Aside from that I was delighted to travel the country I've heard my Dad talk about for years, my favorite spots being Panang and Redang Island! So beautiful. I'm not really sure what else to say just that I'm delighted I decided to try this out!

What would you improve about this program?
I would have liked a little bit more communication between AIP and myself after the initial interview and before getting an interview with an interested hotel. Although, in saying that, they replied to every email I sent them.
Default avatar
John
3/10
No, I don't recommend this program

Could Have Been Better

I had requested to do a strategic management internship. Apparently, there is no such thing. During the interview with the AIP consultant, he just called it a "consulting internship." I suggest they change the title. In hindsight, why would any company give an intern any managerial role anyway?

After I paid my deposit, AIP soon found a company for me in Malaysia. In the job description, I saw roles for "market research," "partnership development," and support "in performing various projects." I asked what aspects of the job fell under consulting, and the reply was that the "consulting aspects of the internship would be represented through identification and evaluation of specific business opportunities and market trends, as well as in the partnership development aspect."

I had the interview with my potential boss, and I really got the impression that this was more a sales job--just send out e-mails to gain new clients. Furthermore, it was to be all online--I would not meet anybody to learn negotiation and consulting skills (let alone any "strategic management"). I expressed my concerns to my consultant, and he assured me I would "have more freedom and work on business development, strategic expansions and be more involved in terms of decision making." Well, that sounded good, and I was hoping to gain some business consulting experience; so, I took it.

It turned out that my first instincts were right. I was just sending e-mails all day: no market research, no partnership development, no performing various projects, no business development, no strategic expansions, and no decision making! Just sending e-mails! I only got to do something different after I spoke with my boss about it, but the crux of my job would still be sending e-mails. What’s worse, I looked on my company's website. It turns out that they were advertising for what I was doing, and my job role was not “Strategic Management Intern”; it was “Business Development Intern”!

My mistake was not contacting AIP after I began my internship. In the contract, it states that if you encounter any problems, AIP will talk to your company to try to resolve them, or find you a new company.

However, I really wish that AIP would have followed up with me. True, I failed to read the contract carefully, but, for these types of programs, a responsible agency will check in with you regularly to see if everything is going all right. If they had, perhaps I would have had a better experience. Moreover, it’s not always convenient (and cost-effective) for interns to simply switch companies, particularly if they are staying short-term.

Another thing, they came out with location offers in Taiwan and South Korea soon after they gave me my internship in Malaysia. I really wish they had told me about them when I was applying. I would happily have gone to either of those two countries since they are more aligned with my background.

As for what was included in my internship package, I was never informed of any networking events, and I did not receive any certification of achievement from my host company. Frankly, I never heard from AIP again after I paid them the money.

In summary, while my boss was very nice, I didn’t learn very much, and my responsibilities as listed on my initial offer turned out to be inaccurate. I admit that I should have taken a more proactive role in resolving the issue, but I am just surprised there was so much miscommunication between AIP and my company.