Greece is arguably one of the most beautiful places in the world. Located right on the Mediterranean, Greece’s rich history is as alluring as its Spanakopita and sunlight-covered beaches. Why wouldn't you want to volunteer in Greece?

However, in the wake of Greece’s economic troubles, volunteer work is sorely needed. Animal shelters need help taking care of abandoned pets, sea turtle conservation enlists the help of volunteers, and young students would greatly benefit from English teachers. Volunteering in Greece combines means making a large impact on the community while enjoying a beautiful and natural landscape.

Animal Conservation

One of the most popular ways for foreigners to volunteer in Greece is by working in animal conservation. Specifically, volunteers are needed to help conserve Greece's sea turtle population.

If you want to volunteer in Greece with sea turtles, the best time of the year to plan a trip is May through September.

You can also find volunteer projects in Greece working at animal shelters, with dolphins, or other environmental conservation issues.

Community Development

More than half of Greece’s youth is unemployed. The young and the old need assistance given that the government is helpless to provide it itself. Teaching English and basic syntax to elementary-level students is a great way to improve the community.


The Greek education system is weak and inadequate for those hoping to continue into higher education. While after-school private tutoring was popular before the collapse, such option is much less convenient for families who are already suffering to make ends meet.

Volunteering Tips

Best places to Volunteer: Athens, Thessaloniki, and Prespes

How to save money while volunteering: Take a bus or bike instead of renting a car; don’t waste bags of money at bars; find out which bank charges less for using your ATM.

Volunteer Support: You will probably find that volunteers in Greece are well received. The Greek government and Greek locals are very appreciative of anyone who is willing to come and help rebuild the Greek economy, no matter the area. If there is a problem, Greece is not a third-world country. You can easily go to a consulate or embassy for answers to any questions or help with any applications.

Health and Safety of Volunteers in Greece

If you hold European Union citizenship, a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) provides coverage for emergencies but not for emergencies that require the patient to fly back home.

You don’t have to be jabbed with drugs to travel to Greece. With that being said, it would behoove you to take the following vaccinations: tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella and hepatitis B.

Bar scams and thefts are unfortunately on the rise in Greece, particularly Athens. Do not be fooled when a couple of beautiful local Greeks keep asking for drinks. You will be left with a massive bill. Similarly, make sure to lock up or hide your valuables whenever you leave a hostel, a home, a hotel, or one of the many flea markets.


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