In 2005, a study conducted by The Economist found that the Republic of Ireland had the best quality of life in the world. From 1995 to 2007, Ireland went through a period of high economic growth giving the country the title of the “Celtic Tiger." Among the other reasons: the rich cultural history, the active nightlife, the friendly residents, the tradition of Irish pubs, the country’s passion for sports, and all the famous faces to have come out of Ireland - Pierce Brosnan, Bono, and Oscar Wilde to name a few. Given all the above-mentioned reasons, it’s no wonder Ireland receives 6.4 million foreign tourists every year. There’s also no doubt that interning in Ireland is worth experiencing for everyone.

There are so many benefits to interning in Ireland: experience, skills, knowledge, culture, and beauty. With all these great reasons, it’s clear why you should turn Ireland into your own personal HIREland.

Given the wide variety of industries in Ireland, it’s no surprise that there are many internship fields available.

  • Marketing/Advertising: Ireland is home to creative minds and some of the world’s leading advertising agencies. Interns could work at either one of these advertising agencies or within the marketing department of a large company. Your daily tasks could include working on advertising campaigns, developing creative briefs and strategies, or conducting market research. As marketing becomes more and more of a global affair, interning in Ireland is a great way to make your resume stand out with some international work experience.
  • Healthcare: If you are a pre-medical student interested in gaining insight into healthcare abroad, an internship in Ireland is a perfect opportunity. There are internships available in nursing, public health, rehabilitation, pharmacy, health services, education, research, and therapy. Depending on your internship, you may be able to shadow doctors on their daily rounds, observe surgeries, care for children, or conduct research. Your internship tasks will also depend on your skills and knowledge of the medical field.
  • Environmental: Ireland is not known as the “Emerald Isle” for no reason. As Ireland tries to preserve its natural beauty, interns interested in conservation, waste management, sustainability, and biodiversity are more than welcome. For those interested in the environment, internships are available at energy efficiency agencies, the sustainability offices of cities, the Green Party of Ireland, nonprofits, and Irish businesses in general.

When and Where to Look for an Internship:

If you are looking to intern in Ireland, there are generally opportunities available throughout the year for most fields. Many internships will be located in large cities like Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Galway, and Waterford. However, there are also internships available in smaller towns around Ireland.

Visas for Interning in Ireland:

In order to intern in Ireland, you will need a Short Term Employment visa. Your employer in Ireland will need to sponsor you in order to apply for the visa. You will also need an employment, contract, letter from your employer, and proof of medical insurance for your trip in Ireland. It is possible that your visa officer may ask for evidence of qualifications and previous work experience in the area you are working in. For more information, visit the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service.

Cost of Living in Ireland:

In general, there is not a huge difference in the cost of living in the suburbs or in major city in Ireland. Rent for a one bedroom apartment per month is about 600€, and go up on depending on size and furnishings. In general, rent in Ireland is fairly low compared to other countries in Europe - making it a popular destination for expats.

Work Culture in Ireland:
  • Etiquette: The business environment in Ireland is generally more relaxed than in other European countries. Firm handshakes and smiling is considered the general greeting. Since business is relaxed, meetings quickly become casual and first names are used very soon after meeting. Another important thing to note about Irish work culture is that how you speak says a lot about how you will be perceived; for example, bragging is considered impolite and a sense of humor is considered highly important.
  • Language: English is spoken almost everywhere; Irish is only spoken by a small minority even though it is the national language.
  • Networking: Networking is one way to build lasting relationships in Ireland. Most networking occurs after work at dinners or by going out for a drink. You may also join networking organizations in Ireland such as BNI Ireland or NetworkIreland.
Work and Labor Laws in Ireland:

Ireland has created specific workplace rights for interns. These include the right to protection from excessive working hours, adequate breaks, public holidays, protection from sexual and other types of harassment or discrimination, data protection, fair procedure, and join a union. For more information and specifics, visit the Irish Congress of Trade Unions.

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